American Heart Association - You’re the Cure
WELCOME! PLEASE LOGIN OR SIGN UP

LoginLogin with Facebook

Remember me Forgot Password

Be the Cure, Join Today!

  • Learn about heart-health issues
  • Meet other likeminded advocates
  • Take action and be heard
SIGN UP

Advocates Like You View All

Cinny Kittle West Virginia

To our You're the Cure advocates, August means Congressional August Recess meetings. In West Virginia, that often means Cinny Kittle will be busier than usual speaking out for improved health, and this August was no exception.

On August 4th, Cinny joined WV Government Relations Director, Christine Compton, in delivering "lunch" to Congressman Nick Rahall's Washington, DC office--a lunch sack filled with puzzle pieces that represent a healthy school meal. The message? Support the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act.

As the Director of Health Improvement Initiatives at the West Virginia Hospital Association for the past 17 years, Cinny works on various projects to positively impact the lives of West Virginians. In addition, she is the Director of the Tobacco-Free WV Coalition, the co-founder and director of the WV Breastfeeding Alliance, she serves of the steering committee for the WV Perinatal Partnership and founded the Day One program to help get newborn babies off to their best start.

Cinny is committed to improving the health of our fellow Mountaineers. She is a strong advocate for public health and a terrific asset to the groups she collaborates with on a regular basis. With her busy schedule and many commitments, we are fortunate to have her as a passionate You're the Cure advocate and outstanding member of the American Heart Association’s Advocacy Committee. Thank you, Cinny, for all you to do improve the health of West Virginia!

Superwoman’s real name is Colleen Dudley. Colleen is a very busy women, but she still finds a way to be active in her DC community, whether it’s at a hospital, as an AHA You’re the Cure Advocate, or as a volunteer.

Colleen received her bachelor’s degree in nursing at Cleveland State University and then worked as a nurse at a Neurology and Stroke Unit in Cleveland. Currently, she is the Stroke Program Coordinator at Medstar Georgetown University Hospital (MGUH) and is working toward her masters in nursing at John Hopkins University.

Despite these demands for her time, she still finds a way to be active in the DC community. Colleen often volunteers with Miriam’s Kitchen, an organization that provides nutritious meals and social services to the homeless. She advocates for nurses in DC and is a member of the American Heart Association’s DC Advocacy Coordinating Committee. Colleen has been an advocate with the AHA for over a year and a half – she became involved with the AHA because of her passion to help people live healthier lives and her experiences as a nurse. Colleen has been a committed and motivated advocate.

One moment that really stands out is when she advocated to implement changes in her own workplace. When she learned about the Workplace Wellness bill in the District (which requires 50 percent of food in government vending machines to meet healthy standards), she decided to implement a similar program in her own workplace. According to Colleen, this was a rewarding experience because she was able to “see the plan come into fruition… and get more people interested in advocacy.”  (Read more about that success HERE!)

Colleen is an advocate with You’re the Cure because she believes that the policies will make a difference in the community. To become an advocate with You’re the Cure please follow this link: http://yourethecure.org/aha/advocacy/register.aspx

 

Katie Krisko-Hagel Eagan, MN

I am a registered nurse.  My Ph.D. is in nursing with a specific focus on heart disease, especially in women. My stroke story is about my mother who died from stroke and heart disease six years ago.

 
It was 1995 when she presented to an emergency room after having experienced dizziness, weakness, and loss of consciousness. She had a known history of high blood pressure yet she was admitted for an inner ear disorder. I was told later by the nurse that she was alert and oriented as evidenced by her ability to answer questions about where she lived, living relatives (who, in fact, were no longer alive), etc. Yet, nobody bothered to check to see if her answers were correct; because they weren't. My mother's memory was quite impaired and by this time, the window of opportunity had passed and brain damage had occurred. Her life was never the same since then. She lost her ability to live independently (she was only in her mid-seventies at the time) and eventually needed to live out her final years in a nursing home as she continued to suffer more strokes. Since 1995, much has improved about how people are assessed in an emergency room and treated by receiving tPA once ischemic stroke has been identified. Many brains have been saved; many lives have been uninterrupted and spared. Also, since 1995, a lot has been done about the prevention of stroke. This has all come about because of research. But, the battle isn't over because many people still suffer and die from stroke and heart disease every year. In fact, heart disease is still the number one killer of men and women in the United States. Research needs to continue in order to change these statistics. Without research, many lives like my mother’s will continue to be cut short or so drastically altered that they will never be the same again. Prevention and adequate treatment is key and can mean the difference between life (as well as quality of life) and death. Only through research can we have any hope to change the statistics. Only by continuing to fund that research, we can make it happen.