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Albuquerque Recognizes World Stroke Day

On Monday, October 20th the Albuquerque City Council issued a proclamation at their meeting declaring October 29th as World Stroke Day.  It was a great event, with around 20 volunteers and public health advocates in attendance. All of the attendees who RSVP’d ahead of time were able to have their names read aloud and they were acknowledged as stroke survivors or AHA volunteers.  We partnered with the Albuquerque Stroke Club on this event, which really helped with its success.

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Meet Pkaye Washington

Hello I'm Pkaye Washington. Back in 1991, I was diagnosed with a hereditary heart condition where the muscles of my heart didn't pump as strong as a normal person.  Since then I've been hospitalized at least three times due to heart related issues. I realized that sodium is my enemy and that I must maintain my body weight to keep excess stress off my heart. 

Maintaining the correct blood pressure has been tricky and a struggle, but each day is a blessing to try again.  In October 2012 I was crowned Ms. Texas Classic of the United America Pageant.  The pageant promotes volunteering at a non-profit organization.  Being a heart patient, the AHA is where I landed, and I'm so glad I did! Being able to use this platform to get the word out about all facets of maintaining a healthy heart has been a true pleasure.  

I have volunteered with the AHA’s Multicultural Initiatives department and currently serve as the Austin Grassroots Action Team Chair.

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Giving Thanks for a Great Year!

As fall draws to a close, we are taking the time to thank all of our volunteers and celebrating a great year. Together, You’re the Cure advocates, like you, successfully advocated for heart healthy and stroke smart policies in their communities and states. We could not achieve the positive change in our communities without each and everyone of you. We are truly thankful for all that you do!

Below are just a few of the accomplishments we are thankful for this year: 

 

  1. Six new states require CPR as a graduation requirement. That means over 1.1 million students will be trained in life-saving CPR every year! With your help, we can add even more states to this list!
  2. Twelve new states require newborn screening for congenital heart defects before they leave the hospital. The earlier we can detect an issue with these little hearts, the better chances at a healthy life. Thirty-two states now require this screening.
  3. A half-a-dozen states increased funding for heart disease and stroke related programs.
  4. Advocates from all over the country made their voice heard in Washington D.C. on issues from more physical education in school to increasing funding for more heart and stroke research.

Once again, thank you for all the work you have done this year and for years to come! We cannot wait to see what the next 12 months brings us, but with your help, we know we will improve the lives of heart and stroke patients across the country.

Want to learn more about what we do? Check out the video below and share it with others!

(Please visit the site to view this video)

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Trick or Treat?

Candy Corn, Gummy Bears, Peanut Butter Cups, Swedish Fish, Candy Bar, Bubblegum and Cotton Candy… These may sound like treats the neighborhood kids are hoping to pick up when they go trick-or-treating later this month, but they’re actually the tricks used by companies to hook our kids on nicotine. These are flavors of e-cigarette liquid available for purchase today.

With alluring flavors like those and a dramatic increase in youth exposure to e-cigarette advertising, the rising popularity of e-cigarettes among youth shouldn’t come as a surprise. Still, it raises concerns. Strong regulations are needed to keep these tobacco products out of the hands of children. We’ve asked the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prohibit the marketing and sale of e-cigarettes to minors, and we’re still waiting for them to act.

Meanwhile, CDC launched this week their #20Million Memorial. 20 million people have died from smoking-related illnesses since the 1964 Surgeon General’s report on smoking and health. Has smoking affected you and your family? Check out this moving online memorial, then share your story or honor loved ones lost too soon with the hashtag #20Million.  

AHA staff and volunteers across the country are preparing to fight the tobacco epidemic in upcoming state legislative sessions. They’ll ask for state funding for tobacco prevention programs and for increased tobacco taxes, a proven deterrent for youth smoking.

This Halloween, don’t let our kids continue to get tricked by the tobacco companies. Help end the tobacco epidemic for good. To amplify our message with lawmakers, ask friends and family members to join us, then watch your inbox for opportunities to act!  

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Knowledge is Power

After working as a registered nurse for the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center for 25 years, and 17 years on the Cardiac Care Intensive Care Unit, Mella Dee Warren was no stranger to cardiovascular diseases and stroke. In addition to her professional acumen, atherosclerosis, hypertension, heart disease and stroke all ran in her family, making Mella Dee highly aware of her own risk for the diseases.

She walked regularly, ate a healthy diet and never smoked, all contributing factors for how well she bounced back from the diagnosis of atrial fibrillation, requiring a pacemaker at the age of 65. It wasn’t until 15 years later, on Dec. 30, 2013 - her 58th wedding anniversary - that she experienced her stroke. She was attempting to put a coffee cup on a kitchen cabinet hanger when she felt numbness in her hand and the entire right side of her body. She sunk to the floor and called for her nephew, whom she instructed to call 9-1-1 to notify them that his auntie was having a stroke.

Emergency first responders rushed the 79-year-old retired nurse to a Get With The Guidelines® Certified Comprehensive Stroke Center where a CT scan determined she indeed was having a stroke. Experts treated her with advanced interventional surgical techniques to remove the clot. Mella Dee received extensive physical therapy and made a full recovery, allowing her to do what she does best, care for others. As a devoted volunteer of the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association, among other health organizations, Mella Dee is now 80 and thriving as she continues to spread awareness and arm her community with lifesaving health and wellness information.”

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Study: Most Wikipedia articles about medical conditions contain errors

Doctors say relaying on medical information from Wikipedia is a mistake.  A research article in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association compared Wikipedia to medical journals and found major flaws in articles regarding diabetes, high blood pressure, lung cancer and more.

The American Heart Association recommends dialing 9-1-1 if you believe there is a medical emergency.  If there is not an emergency and you want to learn more about health and disease prevention we recommend using trusted sources such as: The American Heart Association (www.heart.org) or the U.S. Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov/ )

For the full news article on this story you can visit: 

http://www.kait8.com/story/26694176/study-most-wikipedia-articles-about-medical-conditions-contain-errors

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NM Advocates Visit Congressional Offices, Promote Healthy School Meals

On Wednesday, August 27th You’re the Cure advocates Jim Myers and Claire Dudley utilized the August Congressional break to advocate for reauthorization of the “Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act.”

They visited district offices to share the message that new nutrition standards ARE working and should not be delayed or weakened. Together, they visited the offices of Senator Martin Heinrich and Senator Tom Udall

The team delivered the message to Congress that healthy school meals ‘fit’ into a successful school day for kids- and that we’re ‘puzzled’ by efforts to weaken or delay the important nutrition standards.  To help make this point, the advocates delivered a lunch bag of puzzle pieces, 4 of which fit together to display a healthy school meal and 1 showing unhealthy food that doesn’t fit. 

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Volunteer Spotlight: Thurman Paul

Thurman Paul of Tulsa, Oklahoma is like many You’re the Cure Advocates; he is connected to stroke. His father’s uncle suffered a stroke two years ago.  His interest in the Advocacy work of the American Heart Association began with a simple call to action to sign a petition in support of obesity prevention on the community level.

Thurman promptly signed the petition and answered a follow-up email to supporters of the petition asking for those interested in learning more about the American Heart Association’s advocacy work to reply to the email. He did so because he believes finding a cure for heart disease and stroke should be a priority.  Thurman’s first activity as a You’re the Cure Advocate involved a visit to U.S. Senator James Inhofe’s office to advocate for the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act.

The concept of volunteerism and activism is not a new one for Thurman. He recently returned from a service trip to Nicaragua where he taught classes and distributed food and supplies to youth groups.

Thurman has also worked with his mother to visit juvenile centers and visit with youth.   Travel and new experiences are a driving factor in his commitment to service. “Volunteerism is a way for me to give back while being around people,” he said. 

Interested in becoming more involved with the American Heart Association’s fight to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular disease and stroke? Email Brian Bowser at brian.bowser@heart.org to learn more about how you can take action!

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What is Pediatric Cardiomyopathy?

Did you know that one in every 100,000 children in the U.S. under the age of 18 is diagnosed with a diseased state of the heart known as cardiomyopathy?  While it is a relatively rare condition in kids, it poses serious health risks, making early diagnosis important.  As the heart weakens due to abnormities of the muscle fibers, it loses the ability to pump blood effectively and heart failure or irregular heartbeats (arrhythmias or dysrhythmia) may occur.

That’s why we’re proud to team up with the Children’s Cardiomyopathy Foundation this month- Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Awareness Month- to make more parents aware of this condition (signs and symptoms) and to spread the word about the policy changes we can all support to protect our youngest hearts.
 
As a You’re the Cure advocate, you know how important medical research is to improving the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of heart disease.  And pediatric cardiomyopathy is no exception.  However, a serious lack of research on this condition leaves many unanswered questions about its causes.  On behalf of all young pediatric cardiomyopathy patients, join us in calling on Congress to prioritize our nation’s investment in medical research.
  
Additionally, we must speak-up to better equip schools to respond quickly to medical emergencies, such as cardiac arrest caused by pediatric cardiomyopathy.  State laws, like the one passed in Massachusetts, require schools to develop emergency medical response plans that can include:

  • A method to establish a rapid communication system linking all parts of the school campus with Emergency Medical Services
  • Protocols for activating EMS and additional emergency personnel in the event of a medical emergency
  • A determination of EMS response time to any location on campus
  • A method for providing training in CPR and First Aid to teachers, athletic coaches, trainers and others – which may include High School students
  • A listing of the location of AEDs and the school personnel trained to use the AED

CPR high school graduation requirements are another important measure to ensure bystanders, particularly in the school setting, are prepared to respond to a cardiac emergency.  19 states have already passed these life-saving laws and we’re on a mission to ensure every student in every state graduates ‘CPR Smart’.
   
With increased awareness and research of pediatric cardiomyopathy and policy changes to ensure communities and schools are able to respond to cardiac emergencies, we can protect more young hearts.

Have you or a loved one been diagnosed with cardiomyopathy?  Join our new Support Network today to connect with others who share the heart condition.   

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Schools Report Students Favor Healthier Lunches

According to a recent study conducted by Bridging the Gap Research of school administrators at elementary, middle and high schools of students’ reactions to the healthier lunches, 70 percent of schools thought that students liked the new lunches.

By the spring of SY 2012‐13, school administrators in U.S. public elementary, middle and high schools reported that the majority of students liked the new meals, at least to some extent. Across all grade levels, most respondents reported that students complained initially in fall 2012 but that far fewer students were complaining by the time of the surveys in spring2013.  

Most American children consume more sugar, fat and sodium and fewer fruits, vegetables and whole grains than recommended. School meals, which feed more than 30 million children and adolescents each year, play a major role in shaping the diets and health of young people.

Learn more about these findings here: http://www.bridgingthegapresearch.org/_asset/h6lbl9/BTG_student_opinions_school_lunch_Jul_14.pdf

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