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My Story: Katie Krisko-Hagel

by Anne S. on Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Katie Krisko-Hagel Eagan, MN

I am a registered nurse.  My Ph.D. is in nursing with a specific focus on heart disease, especially in women. My stroke story is about my mother who died from stroke and heart disease six years ago.

 
It was 1995 when she presented to an emergency room after having experienced dizziness, weakness, and loss of consciousness. She had a known history of high blood pressure yet she was admitted for an inner ear disorder. I was told later by the nurse that she was alert and oriented as evidenced by her ability to answer questions about where she lived, living relatives (who, in fact, were no longer alive), etc. Yet, nobody bothered to check to see if her answers were correct; because they weren't. My mother's memory was quite impaired and by this time, the window of opportunity had passed and brain damage had occurred. Her life was never the same since then. She lost her ability to live independently (she was only in her mid-seventies at the time) and eventually needed to live out her final years in a nursing home as she continued to suffer more strokes. Since 1995, much has improved about how people are assessed in an emergency room and treated by receiving tPA once ischemic stroke has been identified. Many brains have been saved; many lives have been uninterrupted and spared. Also, since 1995, a lot has been done about the prevention of stroke. This has all come about because of research. But, the battle isn't over because many people still suffer and die from stroke and heart disease every year. In fact, heart disease is still the number one killer of men and women in the United States. Research needs to continue in order to change these statistics. Without research, many lives like my mother’s will continue to be cut short or so drastically altered that they will never be the same again. Prevention and adequate treatment is key and can mean the difference between life (as well as quality of life) and death. Only through research can we have any hope to change the statistics. Only by continuing to fund that research, we can make it happen.