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Lois Mauch North Dakota

We all want to make a difference; I had the opportunity to participate as a representative of North Dakota Society of Healthy and Physical Educators, (ND SHAPE) with the American Heart Association Lobby day. Advocacy is important no matter what your profession is and becoming a member of that profession is also just as important. 

I am a physical education teacher and now a director for a federal grant to promote physical education, physical activity and good nutrition; I was honored when asked to be a part of the American Heart Association Lobby day.  I wrote letters to my representatives and asked them to stop by the booth.  They all stopped to say hello and discuss the bills and changes we needed to make for our young people.  There were moments of frustration, gratitude, laughter, and honor.  Conversations were meaningful and satisfying and it opened new doors to look at other bills that might be sponsored in favor of a healthier America.

Advocacy requires teamwork.  Teamwork is the ability to work together toward a common vision, the ability to direct individual accomplishments toward organizational objectives, and it is the fire that allows common people to attain uncommon results. Let's remember after all, our students who need heart healthy education, activities and good nutrition are about 30% of the population but they are 100% of the FUTURE! 

You, too, need to become a member of your professional organization.  Make a difference, lobby for a cause you believe in. The experience will set you on fire! You might even get in on a selfie!

Leonard Edloe Jr, PharmD,Virginia

Dr. Leonard Edloe is a staunch supporter for the profession of pharmacy in numerous areas of public policy. The drive to help others led him to many worthwhile pursuits, including active advocacy with You’re the Cure.

A retired pharmacist now, Dr. Edloe was the Chief Executive Officer of Edloe's Professional Pharmacies, one of America’s largest chains of black-owned pharmacies located in Richmond, Virginia. He is the Pastor of New Hope Fellowship in Hartfield, VA. He also holds a long-list of prestigious awards and board appointments and has a passion for getting people to really understand the drugs they’re taking and being healthy.  “Doc,” as he is often referred to, was likely Richmond area’s best-known pharmacist.  At the age of 65, he closed the nearly seven decade old pharmacy that was started by his father.

His story is not unfamiliar to many cardiovascular advocates.  He admits, “I have a terrible history of cardiovascular disease in my family.”  His sister died of a heart attack, and his brother also, at only 54. A total of five family members have been directly affected by cardiovascular disease. He had his own scare when he suffered a heart attack at the tender age of 38.

Among numerous endeavors to look out for his fellow man, Dr. Edloe recommended establishment of the ‘Preferred Drug List’ to the Governor of Virginia, approval of which not only saved the Commonwealth hundreds of millions of dollars, but maintained fees paid to pharmacists for their services. He has been a tremendous resource to editors and reporters in both print and TV media. He is a frequent guest on nationwide radio shows and even hosts his own radio show on Thursday’s expanding the role pharmacists play in healthcare. (Listen to his show on WCLM between 11:30am and 1pm Thursdays!)

When asked what he feels is lacking in the area of cardiovascular disease he stated “More could be done…  what is happening now in the medical community is there is a strong focus on medication instead of diet, exercise and stopping the behaviors that often cause illness. The approach to just add more medication is going to catch up with people. Eating right and exercising have been important since Genesis was written. We have wonderful medical technology but we should not depend on it for a quick cure.”  He went as far as to remove salt shakers from the tables at the church he pastored.  In 1975 while a practicing pharmacist, he even stopped selling tobacco products in all of his pharmacies.

Currently serving in a leadership capacity to Virginia’s You’re the Cure advocacy team, he says, “As individuals we should be concerned for each other.  Personal responsibility and looking out for others is the answer.”  His track record amply demonstrates a man living that credo.

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

<Thanks to You’re The Cure advocate Karen Wiggins for help developing this blog post>

Marilyn Boyd was 46-years-old, one day and 90-years-old the next.

She couldn’t move her right side and speaking had become difficult — at least that’s what she was told. “I thought that something must’ve been wrong with their ears because in my head, I sounded fine,” Marilyn said. “That’s one of the things of a stroke that’s really strange.” Although she was still 46, Marilyn’s abilities had become so hindered due to her stroke, she felt she was much older.

Marilyn’s survivor story began when she was outside her Jackson, Tennessee home wrangling the family’s cats one July night in 2002. While reaching for a cat under a metal chair, something went wrong. “I had a cat-tatrophe,” said Marilyn. That wrong move caused Marilyn to collapse and she hit her head on a terra cotta flower pot. Her husband Howard heard the clash and called for an ambulance when he saw her unconscious. Doctors now describe her incident as a “traumatic cerebral accident leading to a stroke.” 

“I didn’t have any risk factors for stroke,” said Marilyn. “This is something that can truly hit anyone at any time.”

After her treatment in the hospital, Marilyn began learning elementary skills again, like speaking, brushing her teeth and tying her shoes. The main focus of her rehabilitation was speech therapy, and after months of work and continued concentration, Marilyn could communicate again.

Now, Marilyn is speaking out in a big way. Using her experiences for reference, she has spent many hours in the offices of her local, state and federal lawmakers to help increase funding on stroke research, care and education.

“If you talk enough to enough people, somebody’s gonna do something,” she said.

Marilyn’s hoping that not only lawmakers, but also stroke survivors will get involved. She believes - by sharing her story other stroke survivors would benefit.

“I don’t view myself as significant,” Marilyn said. “But the issue is significant, so anything that’s done to help it is so important.”