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No one in Prince George’s County is more passionate about heart health than Gail Harris-Berry. Since becoming a You’re the Cure advocate in 2012, Gail has worked hard to keep her friends, family, and community informed on how to live a heart healthy life.

Gail has been an active Prince George’s County resident since 1969. She spends her time assisting senior citizens, as well as serving as an ordained minister. Her role as a minister gives her the opportunity to speak with community members and share her amazing story, which you can learn about HERE. As an American Heart Association ambassador, she frequently speaks to local government leaders, and advocates for CPR in Schools and the need for more comprehensive studies of heart disease among women.

Gail believes in being proactive about her heart health. To her, an ounce of prevention really is worth a pound of cure.

“Because we live so long, it is important to be as healthy as possible, to truly enjoy that time and enjoy the highest quality of life possible. Be proactive in preventing disease; not reactive. The benefits will come.” 

As someone who has experienced heart episodes in the past, she understands better than most how much prevention, such as improved nutrition, can make a difference in improving quality of life and reducing the risk of heart disease. Improving nutrition in Prince George’s County Maryland is particularly important to her because she has so many friends and family, including grandchildren, who live there. As a You’re the Cure advocate, Gail educates her community that better nutrition can reduce obesity, diabetes, and improve heart health.

Gail believes that healthy food options should be available for everyone, including in vending machines.

“Adding nutritious foods to vending machines would give everyone the chance to eat a little better. So many people live with heart disease and obesity, especially in Prince George’s County.  Having better food options would help to prevent diseases down the road and save people from expensive medical bills.”

Gail is an active You’re the Cure advocate in Prince George’s County and the Greater Washington Region and invites anyone who wants to make a difference in reducing heart disease and stroke to join the network at www.yourethecure.org.

 

 

 

<Special thanks to You’re the Cure intern Spencer Davis for development of this blog post>

Hayden Grimm Iowa

Hayden was born January 21, 2011, and at the time his parents had no idea anything was wrong with him. Twelve hours after he was born though, he was taken to the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. He was diagnosed with Hypo-plastic Left Heart Syndrome. Hayden had his first open heart surgery at six days old, second at five months and third at three and a half years old. Hayden will never be "fixed," but he is doing well. He is currently on 3 daily medications, loves pickles and salad and stays active. He just finished up Preschool and is excited to go to Kindergarten in the Fall!

Join Hayden and his family on September 11, 2016 at the McGrath Amphitheatre for the Cedar Rapids Heart Walk to help fight heart disease and stroke in Iowa!

Bill O'Neal Missouri

Bill O'Neal's heart stopped while he was giving 40 students an ACT test.  "I always think it’s a bit ironic that I taught for two years at the Collegiate School for Medicine and Bioscience and I gave the kids some hands on experience," O'Neal said.

This teacher of more than 30 years has spent his career giving lessons at the head of the class. But he had no warning of the big one he'd be giving right at this spot in this St. Louis magnet school on April 19. "I don't remember coming up to this room to proctor the ACT," said O'Neal, who is 59.  "I have no memory of the event at all."

Without warning, Bill suddenly collapsed in front of another teacher and more than 40 students taking a test. Statistically, that should have been the end of the story. Ninety percent of people whose hearts stop suddenly outside of a medical setting, don't make it to a hospital alive. Read More.