American Heart Association - You’re the Cure
WELCOME! PLEASE LOGIN OR SIGN UP

LoginLogin with Facebook

Remember me Forgot Password

Be the Cure, Join Today!

  • Learn about heart-health issues
  • Meet other likeminded advocates
  • Take action and be heard
SIGN UP

Advocates Like You View All

Emilie Singh, Virginia-District of Columbia

"When Chloe Saved Gracie’s Life"

It was a busy Sunday in 2013 and no one realized my 8 year old daughter Gracie wasn’t feeling well.  She woke up late and asked to take a bath but we told her we wanted to go to Costco first.  We went out to Costco and ran a few other errands.  June in Arizona …it was a hot day. 

When we got home Gracie again asked if she could take a bath. She’s old enough to take baths on her own, and she got it started by herself.  I was upstairs while she was in the tub for a bit, but then went downstairs to change the laundry, and I would occasionally yell “Grace are you ok?” and she would answer “yes”.  My other daughter Chloe (age 11 at the time) was in her room next to the upstairs bathroom watching a show. 

On my way back upstairs with the laundry I again yelled “Grace are you ok?”  But this time she didn’t answer.  I just had a weird feeling, I dropped the laundry, raced into the bathroom and found Gracie blue under the water not breathing.

I started screaming at the top of my lungs “Call 911, call 911!”  As I grabbed Gracie and pulled her out of the tub and put her on the floor, Chloe pushed past me and started performing CPR, pushing on her chest hard with both hands. 

By the time my husband got upstairs with the phone and 911 on the line, Gracie was coughing and spitting up water.  In a few minutes we had her on her bed, covered with a towel and there were 10 firemen and police men in her room.  She was disoriented but thank God she was breathing. 

Gracie lost consciousness so she really doesn’t remember what happened, but she has heard us talk about it.  We just call it “When Chloe Saved Gracie’s Life.”  It seems like the best way to describe the event. 

It turned out that it had been a febrile seizure because, unknown to us, she was already sick and then went into a hot bath. It just made her fever go up higher.  Gracie spent 3 days in the hospital, and Chloe didn’t want to leave her side.  

I can’t even express how grateful I am that Chloe learned CPR in her classroom.  I wish every kid would…you just never know when it could turn them into someone else’s hero.  Chloe was certainly Gracie’s.

See the family retell the gripping story here

 

The University of Vermont Medical Center has been outstanding in its support of a two cent per ounce excise tax on sugary drinks to reduce obesity in Vermont. Stephen Leffler, the Chief Medical Officer for the hospital, has been a tireless advocate testifying before a legislative committee, speaking at a press conference launching the campaign and recently posting the following on the Medical Center's blog.

 

Why We Support a Tax on Sugary Beverages

Recently, I had the opportunity to travel to Montpelier and advocate for a tax on sugary drinks. You might wonder why a physician would get involved in a tax debate? It’s simple. It’s because sugary drinks are a significant health concern for Vermonters.

Obesity and diabetes are major health issues for Vermonters and our country. Sugary drinks are linked to both conditions. The future of health care is partnering with and engaging our patients to keep them as healthy as possible. We know that the long-term health of our patients is influenced more by their actions and choices during daily life, versus what happens when they’re in our exam rooms. Patients who make good choices in terms of smoking, exercise and diet will live longer and healthier lives and consume less health care resources. That is how you drive down health care costs.

Public policies can be powerful tools to aide in these efforts. Policies, such as taxes, can help our patients make better, healthier choices. Cigarette taxes have proven this. As the cigarette tax has increased, smoking rates have dropped. Would any of us consider turning the clock back on that and go back to the days when nearly 40 percent of us were smoking $2 packs of cigarettes? If a 1-liter soda costs more than a pint of milk or water, more people will make the healthier choice. Why does that matter? Because sugary drinks are a major factor in obesity. Researchers estimate that sugar-added drinks account for at least one-fifth of the weight gained by the U.S. population between 1977 and 2007.

Consumption of sugary drinks is the single largest category of caloric intake for U.S. children, surpassing milk in the late 1990s. Think about that for a second. Sugary drinks account for more calories than fruits, vegetables, dairy products and healthy protein sources. Increasing the cost of sodas and energy drinks will help people make better choices. They will likely consume healthier, cheaper alternatives.

To be clear, there is nothing wrong with an occasional soda. It should be a treat. Like having an ice cream cone. Today, many people do not think of a soda like a treat. Most people trying to eat a healthy diet would not have six ice cream cones a day but may not think twice about drinking a six pack of soda. That could be more than 1,000 empty calories with no nutritional benefits.

I grew up in a small town in Vermont and my parents owned a general store. I spent many hours of my life stocking coolers with sodas, milk, water and so on. I witnessed Vermonters making choices about what to buy every day. They were smart with their money. Making sugary drinks more expensive will help them be even smarter with their money and their health.

What’s more, the money raised from a sugary beverages tax can be used to help teach Vermonters and their children how to eat healthier, and actually make more nutritious foods more easily available. For example, we could direct funds to expand the impact of food access programs like Vermont Farm to Family, NOFA Vermont’s Farm Share program, Green Mountain Farm to School, and Vermont FEED – not to mention new programs. Revenue could also be used to offset the increased costs incurred from obesity. I firmly believe this tax is the right thing for our patients and our state.

Stephen M. Leffler, MD, FACEP, is the Chief Medical Officer at the UVM Medical Center, former Medical Director of the Emergency Department, and has been a practicing physician for 20 years. He is also a Professor at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. He grew up in Brandon, Vermont.

Sources

Block G. Foods contributing to energy intake in the US: Data from NHANES III and NHANES 1999–2000. J Food Comp Anal 17 (2004): 439-47.

Woodward-Lopez*, Janice Kao and Lorrene Ritchie, To what extent have sweetened beverages contributed
to the obesity epidemic? Public Health Nutrition p. 4 (2010)

Malik, et al., DIABETES CARE, VOLUME 33, NUMBER 11, NOVEMBER 2010

Eight years ago, Rhonda Hall was diagnosed with hypothyroidism and soon after that, she was diagnosed with diabetes. In just one day, she became a four shot-a-day diabetic and had high cholesterol and hypertension as well. Rhonda explained that it was an extremely tough time, but despite the challenges she eventually started working out every day and joined an organization to help her get her eating habits back on the right track. Rhonda has now lost 100 pounds over the past year and because of her lifestyle change, she is no longer an insulin-dependent or medicine-dependent diabetic. She has cut her hypertension and high cholesterol medicine in half and is doing everything that she can to let people know that they can do it too. “Many people in my family are diabetic and when we talk about our family history, we think that that’s the end of the story, and it doesn’t have to be,” explained Hall. "I don’t care what my history says, because my history says I should still be on 4 shots a day, but my determination says no more.” Rhonda was named a 2014-2015 National Go Red Real Woman. Rhonda continues to share her story and helps let all women know that through simple changes, everybody has an opportunity to get healthy.