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You're the Cure at the Ohio Statehouse - October 7, 2015

CPR in Schools Advocacy Day

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Please note the new location for this event!
The Sheraton Columbus Hotel at Capitol Square

75 E. State Street, Columbus, Ohio 43215
Judicial Room

Make plans to join us at the Statehouse as we meet with legislators and urge them to support Ohio House Bill 113, CPR in Schools, which will train the next generation of lifesavers!

Registration

Please click here to register.

The Details

Before the event: We will host briefing conference calls to allow participants to learn the priority issues, logistics for the event, and tips on speaking with legislators. There are two call options on the registration form - you need only attend one.

Call Options:
Thursday, October 1st at 10:30 a.m.

Monday, October 5th at Noon

Event Day: Registration and training will be held in the Judicial Room at the Sheraton Columbus Hotel - Capitol Square, located at 75 E. State Street.

Advocacy Day Agenda:

8:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m. Registration Judicial Room - Sheraton Hotel
9:00 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. Issue Training & Logistics Overview* Judicial Room - Sheraton Hotel
9:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. Group Strategy Meetings Judicial Room - Sheraton Hotel
10:00 a.m. Legislative Meetings Begin

Statehouse & Riffe Center

 


 

 

*Lunch vouchers will be provided.

Please note that legislative meetings may continue up until 2:30 p.m.

Driving Directions and Parking Information

Accessibility at the Statehouse

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Oregon 2015 Legislative Session Wrap Up

Guest Blogger: Sarah Higginbotham

When our state leaders head to the capitol for the six month legislative session, they have a lot on their minds—not the least of which is the health of Oregonians. It’s the job of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association and our allies in public health to ensure that decision makers know the most effective ways to improve the health of all Oregonians, and how to protect them from Oregon’s number one cause of death, cardiovascular disease, and our number one cause of preventable disability, stroke.

Oregon’s 2015 Legislative Session was a busy one for the AHA and our advocates. Here are the highlights:

  • CPR in Schools Passes: The AHA and a team of remarkable advocates led the charge to make Oregon the 23rd state to pass CPR in Schools legislation. Thanks to Senate Bill 79, all Oregon students will be trained in CPR before graduating, ultimately adding over 45,000 new lifesavers across every Oregon community. Thanks to all of the Oregon Legislature for unanimously supporting CPR in Schools, and a special thanks to Sen. Arnie Roblan, Sen. Mark Hass, Rep. Carla Piluso, Rep. Margaret Doherty, and Rep. Jeff Reardon for their leadership.
  • Improvements for Oregon’s School Food: The AHA supported continuing Oregon’s legacy as a leader in school nutrition by aligning our state’s school nutrition standards with the updated federal guidelines. House Bill 2404 will help ensure kids get the healthy food they need for a healthy future.
  • Funding for Tobacco Prevention: We helped to protect $4 million for fighting the harms of tobacco in Oregon. Tobacco use remains the number one preventable cause of death in Oregon, and our tobacco prevention programs have been effective at reducing consumption.
  • Funding for Physical Education: We helped to protect $4 million for PE in schools that will help schools hire teachers and get more active minutes into their day. This generation of kids is the most inactive in history, and it’s more important than ever that schools support healthy active living.
  • Increasing Access to Health Care: We helped pass a bill, House Bill 2468, that will put Oregon’s Insurance Division to work trying to make insurance plans more transparent and to help consumers access the care they need when they need it.

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Hands-Only CPR

Authored by Lisa Vittayarukskul, CSULA U.S.U. Board of Directors Chair

As you may know, California had a chance to create a new generation of lifesavers by passing legislation to teach Hands-Only CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) to high school students as a component for graduation. Unfortunately, the bill did not pass this legislative session, but that doesn’t mean we’re giving up the cause, and here’s why!

Each year, over 326,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States. Cardiac arrest – an electrical malfunction in the heart that causes an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) and disrupts the flow of blood to the brain, lungs and other organs – is a leading cause of death in the United States. When a person has a cardiac arrest, survival often depends on immediately receiving emergency cardiac care including effective bystander CPR and use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). For every minute without CPR, survival from witnessed cardiac arrest decreases 7-10 percent.  The time between the initial 9-1-1 telephone call and the arrival of Emergency Medical Services personnel may be longer than five minutes; therefore, a cardiac arrest victim’s survival is likely dependent on a bystander emergency cardiac care.

Unfortunately, the truth is approximately 70% of Americans felt helpless to act during a cardiac emergency because they do not know how to perform CPR or they are afraid of hurting the victim.

New research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) showcased data which reflected that the number of people with cardiac arrest who got bystander CPR and use of defibrillators by first response increased from around 14% in 2010 to 23.1% in 2013. In addition, prior research has shown that Hands-Only CPR –focusing solely on chest compressions–can prevent brain damage and double or triple survival rates. Another study followed patients with bystander-witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCAs) between 2005 and 2010 and found that the number of events had increased; with on-site public defibrillators, the bystander chest compression and bystander defibrillation had increased as well. Overall, bystanders who offer CPR to a person in need can improve their survival rates and reduce associated neurological issues, such as brain damage that can result from cardiac arrest.

According to the official journal of the American Heart Association, Circulation, provision of bystander CPR is known to be a critical determinant of survival from OHCAs. Affiliated studies have demonstrated survival rates much higher (from 47.6% to 53%) than the estimated overall average rate of survival from OHCA (7.9%), using a variety of strategies for early defibrillation in which AEDs were used by responders who were not healthcare professionals.

As stated in Circulation, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation strongly recommended in 2003 that CPR training be incorporated into secondary school student’s curriculum with the rationale that over the long term, teaching students lifesaving skills of Hands-On CPR would annually put thousands of lifesavers in our communities, creating a generation of first responders.

So far, only 24 states have established policies to incorporate CPR training for high school graduation. With 4,495 high schools in California and only two districts mandating CPR training as a high school requirement, there thousands of students missing out on learning the lifesaving skills of Hands-On CPR!  We will continue to pursue local and state level legislation to incorporate emergency cardiac care skills, like Hands-On CPR, into our schools with the goal of creating a new generation of lifesavers.

If you don’t know Hands-On CPR, take two minutes to learn the basic skills here.

 

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Stroke Task Force Moves Quickly and Gov. Malloy Holds Formal Signing For CPR Bill

Summer may be seen a slower time in in the legislature, but that’s not the case with the Department of Health Task Force to Study Stroke. The group has begun meeting regularly and it’s clear that everyone in the group is dedicated to improving stroke systems of care in Connecticut. The group recently met this past Tuesday and began fleshing out the beginning pieces of the recommendations they will make to the Connecticut General Assembly in the 2016 legislative session.

It’s exciting to watch the legislative process right from the start and see how the different groups work together to craft a final product. It will be interesting to see what the recommendations look like, but there appears to be consensus in the group that whatever the final product is, it should include the implementation of a tiered system of stroke facility designation and the establishment of a statewide stroke registry. These two provisions would ensure that if a person suffers a stroke they can be transported the nearest stroke center in the shortest amount of time and the registry will collect data that will help inform decisions and best practices when treating stroke.

The Task Force will be meeting the 1st and 3rd Tuesday of each month, this is an aggressive meeting schedule and they are even looking to expand the end date of the Task Force past the July 16, 2016 deadline to ensure systems of care in Connecticut are able to adapt to the ever changing field of medicine. So stay tuned.

In other news, Governor Malloy held a ceremonial bill signing on Wednesday, August 5th for Senate Bill 962, which will require all students to receive CPR training prior to graduation. AHA volunteer Mahika Jhangiani is pictured with Governor Malloy in the photo above. Mahika, a certified Emergency Medical Responder since she was a sophomore in high school, testified in support of SB 962 and teaches hands-only CPR to students in Norwalk.

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Options for CPR and AED Instruction in Schools

Thank you for your interest in training the next generation of lifesavers!  With your leadership, we can save more lives from the dangers of cardiac arrest in New York.  There are several low or no cost options for your school to consider for CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) and AED (automated external defibrillator) instruction.

Low Cost Option #1: CPR in Schools Training Kit™

Need a turnkey educational program to teach CPR with hands-on practice?               

The CPR in Schools Training Kit includes:

  • 10 Mini-Anne® Plus inflatable manikins
  • 10 kneel mats with carry bags
  • 10 practice-while-watching training DVDs (English & Spanish)
  • Hand pump for manikin inflation
  • 2 mesh collection and storage bags
  • Classroom carry bag
  • 50 replacement airways
  • 50 manikin wipes
  • 10 replacement face mask
  • Facilitator Guide
  • Lesson Plan
  • Online resources include: trainer webinar, tracking tool for numbers of students trained, facilitator training record, pre- and post-test, letter to parents, and printable certificate of completion
  • The CPR in Schools Training Kit is an all-in-one educational program for educators, school nurses and student leaders to train groups of students at once in a school setting. In one class period students will learn the core skills of CPR. The kit is reusable and can train hundreds of students.
  • Cost: $625

For more information or to order go to:  www.heart.org/cprinschools

Low Cost Option #2: Hands-Only CPR using the single CPR Anytime kit:

Each single CPR Anytime Kit includes:

  • Mini Anne® CPR Learning Manikin
  • CPR Skills Practice DVD (English & Spanish)
  • Adult CPR & AED Reminder Card
  • Mini Anne® replacement airway
  • Manikin Wipes
  • Cost: $38.50 per kit

CPR Anytime Kits are self-directed programs designed to teach the core skills of CPR in about 22 minutes. This self-directed DVD course teaches the core CPR and AED skills needed to recognize and take action during a cardiac arrest. On average, up to three people can learn from one kit. The kits can be used to train small groups and organizations.

For more information or to order go to:  www.cpranytime.org

No Cost Option #1:  Hands-Only CPR using online tools

  • Using existing school equipment (if school has access to a CPR manikin), students can simulate delivering compressions.
  • Video available at no-cost: http://www.handsonlycpr.org/
  • Hands-Only CPR Questions and Answers: http://www.handsonlycpr.org/faqs
  • Be the Beat is a website for teachers and school administrators that provides free tools and resources to help start and sustain CPR and AED programs in schools. Through this website, teachers can download free tools and resources to teach students the two simple steps to Hands-Only™ CPR.  http://bethebeat.heart.org

No Cost Option #2:  Partner with local EMS

Thanks to local EMS, some schools have received Hands-Only training for students at no cost to the school district.  There are many local ambulance services and other EMS organizations. 

https://www.health.ny.gov/professionals/ems/regional.htm

Tips for CPR and AED instruction in the classroom

What should be included in a school CPR training?

♥     Recognition of a possible cardiac arrest and calling 911.

♥     An opportunity for students to practice Hands-Only CPR (compressions).

♥     An awareness of the purpose of an AED and its ease and safety of use.

Suggested Materials (if not using a CPR Kit):

  • YouTube videos
  • CPR manikins  
  • Mats (such as gym mats, garden kneeling mats or yoga mats)
  • AED (Option of bringing students to the school AED)

Prior to class:

  • Inflate manikins.
  • Review any videos that will be used for classroom instruction.
  • Review the instructions provided with your AED (if an AED is available). 
  • If showing students the school AED, check with school officials to see if there is an alarm on the unit.  Some models have an alarm system if opened.
  • Place mat and manikins on the floor, move desks or tables as needed.  Students will kneel to perform compressions.  This is the ideal scenario for quality compression practice.
  • If manikins are placed on desks, students shall stand to perform compressions.

Lesson Plan:

Review why CPR is important:

  • Every hour in the U.S., 38 people will have a sudden cardiac arrest.
  • Sadly, about 90 percent of victims die most likely because they don’t receive timely CPR.
  • A victim’s best chance at survival is receiving bystander CPR until EMTs arrive. 
  • Given right away, CPR doubles or triples survival rates.  

Demonstrate the steps for CPR or show video:

Students are given a demonstration on the steps of Hands-Only CPR.

http://www.handsonlycpr.org/

Students are instructed on AED use.

Divide students into small groups:

Act out the scenario “if someone sees an adult or teen suddenly collapse”. Students can take turns performing compressions.  Remind students to:

  • Check for responsiveness.
  • Call 9-1-1 and tell someone to get the AED.
  • If no signs of life, begin CPR compressions.  Pushing at least 2 inches deep, 100 compressions a minute. 

 To keep students engaged:

  • One student takes the lead and performs compressions. Have students perform 100 compressions in a minute.
  • One student simulates calling 9-1-1.
  • One student simulates going to get an AED if in a public place.

Have music? 

Choose songs that have 100 beats per minute such as “Stayin’ Alive” by the Bee Gees.  For more song ideas, go to the Spotify list located at www.handsonlycpr.org.  Remind students to “Push Hard and Fast” to save a life.

Other videos:

Hands-Only CPR video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8iU3Mtblho&list=PL7A68846B17049716

Keep the beat, Learn Hands-Only CPR video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjKeTo3c2wM

Ken Jeong AHA Hands-Only video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5hP4DIBCEE

AEDs

What is an AED?

An automated external defibrillator (AED) is a computerized medical device. An AED can check a person’s heart rhythm. It can recognize a rhythm that requires a shock. An AED can advise when a shock is needed. The AED uses voice prompts, lights and text messages to tell the rescuer the steps to take.

AEDs are very accurate and easy to use. The AED will walk a person through use and determine if a shock is needed.

Where are they in our school? 

If you do not have an AED simulator, show the students the school’s AED.  Check with your school administration prior to demonstrating AED use with their device.  Remember, some models may have an alarm system if opened.

Discuss with the students how to use it and note many public places have AEDs.  Review the instructions provided with your AED

 In an emergency, you will need to:

  • TURN ON AED
  • Remove clothes from chest and apply pads.
  • Must stand clear of AED while analyzing (if needed push analyze button).
  • If shock is advised, tell everyone to stand clear.
  • Once clear, press shock button. 

Medical Emergency Response Plan

This lesson also presents a good opportunity to review the schools Medical Emergency Response Plan.

 

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Dana Powell

Dana Powell, Mid-Atlantic Affiliate

On January 1, 2012, our family began the year with the birth of our second son, Asa Heard Karchmer. Like all babies, Asa delivered love and wonder into our lives. But those dreams were abruptly shattered on day two of Asa’s life. We came home from Watauga Medical Center in Boone, North Carolina and very soon realized Asa was struggling to breathe. We rushed back to the ER, then a few hours later, my husband and I followed the NeoNatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) transport team as it rushed Asa to Brenner Children’s Hospital in Wake Forest, NC. In the ambulance, Asa received oxygen, IV infusions of antibiotics and antivirals for a possible infections, and prostaglandins to treat a possible cardiac condition. No one was sure what was causing our baby’s medical emergency. Asa was in a state of shock when he arrived at the NICU at 2:00am on January 3 and we were uncertain whether or not he would survive the rest of the night.

By late morning, Asa’s clinical picture started to become clearer. A pediatric cardiologist confirmed that Asa was born with a very special heart – one which, anatomically speaking, worked just fine in utero but couldn’t make the transition to this world without serious medical intervention. His diagnosis was a congenital heart defect known generally as coarctation of the aortic arch (or more specifically as an interrupted aortic arch): a severe constriction of the main artery leading from the left ventricle of the heart and delivering blood to the entire body. It is among the more common types of cardiac defects among newborns and is often accompanied by other cardiac defects (in Asa’s case, a ventricular septal defect, or VSD, and a bicuspid valve). The cardiologist explained that this particular defect was not a problem in utero where there is a bypass shunt (called the PDA) between the pulmonary artery and the aorta, connecting below the arch and the coarctation. This duct began to close a day or two after birth, as it does in all babies. Yet in Asa’s heart, as the PDA closed, the coarctation prevented blood flow to most of his body, putting him into severe crisis.

We sat anxiously for a week with Asa in the NICU, enduring what seemed like an endless battery of tests on his fragile body (spinal tap, EEG, extensive blood work, MRI, etc.) until he was stable enough for heart surgery. So when he was just one week old, Asa underwent open heart surgery to repair the coarctation and VSD. His chest was left open for four more days to accommodate internal swelling but otherwise, Asa pulled through like a superstar. A miracle. In another three weeks, he was nursing well and we finally took him home to his older brother, and friends, in the mountains where we live.

Our experience with Asa’s newborn cardiac crisis gave us emotional and spiritual resources that we would draw upon again, six months later, when he developed Infantile Spasms, a fairly rare and frequently devastating form of childhood epilepsy. Although Asa’s epilepsy remains a daily battle, he is now a lively 3 ½ year old, with a strong and caring heart. He is now the middle of three brothers, each unique, yet Asa’s more difficult journey has deepened and strengthened our own hearts, along with the hearts of everyone who knows him.

Blog content provided by Dana Powell, mother of Asa, and You’re the Cure Advocate

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Summer has arrived in Montana and it's heating up at the AHA

Guest Blogger: Amanda Cahill, Montana Government Relations Director

Summer is officially here and the American Heart Association has big plans!  We are continuing our work to help build a healthier Montana and we wanted to let you know about just a few of the things we have going on.

Events in Montana

Missoula hosted the first HeartChase in Montana on the evening of June 23rd at the University of Montana. This signature event brought families and teams of friends together to compete in heart healthy challenges while racing each other to the finish line. With the support of the Missoula community, we are working harder than ever to hit our 2020 goal: To improve the cardiovascular health of all American by 20% while reducing deaths from cardiovascular diseases and stroke by 20%.  

Missoula Go Red is hosting its first Executive Leadership Team Meeting hosted by the 2016 Chair, Kimberly Roth of Merrill Lynch, to kick-off Go Red for Women 2016 in July.

Mission: Lifeline Montana Grant Project

Are Montanans more likely to die from a heart attack than those living in urban settings?  Unfortunately, the answer is yes which is why the American Heart Association/ American Stroke Association has engaged in a 3 year, 5 million dollar project to improve cardiac care across Montana.  Mission: Lifeline Montana has been providing new equipment, education, and other resources around the state to make sure that our parents, friends, and neighbors receive the best treatment possible.  For more information on this life-saving project, visit www.heart.org/missionlifelinemontana

CPR Education

Did you know that 70% of Montanans DON’T KNOW CPR?  The American Heart Association/ American Stroke Association is hoping to change that.  We are launching a grassroots effort across the state to ensure that kids are taught CPR in school.  By providing a fun, interactive Hands Only CPR training our Montana students can become life savers. 

I hope you have a great summer and if you want to learn more about any of these issues please contact me, Amanda Cahill at Amanda.cahill@heart.org

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Be CPR Smart this Summer

The temperatures are rising in Arizona, and along with it comes lazy days in the pool.  It’s this time of year that we are especially reminded how important it is to know how to respond in an emergency cardiac event.  4 out of 5 cardiac emergencies occur outside of a hospital setting, and roughly only 10% of victims survive the event.  But immediate application of Hands-Only CPR can double or triple survival rates.

Hands Only CPR takes only 2 minutes to learn, and has only 2 steps.  1) Call 9-1-1 and 2) Push hard and fast in the center of the chest at 100 beats per minute.  This is the same as the rhythm in the popular song by the Bee Gee’s “Stayin’ Alive.” 

Each year, in Arizona around 5,000 people die from sudden cardiac arrest and primarily because they did not get timely bystander CPR.  Why not take two minutes this summer to learn Hands Only CPR? The life you save may be the life of someone you love.

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Looking Back at Our Year Together!

The 2015 Legislative session in South Carolina was a lively one, allowing us to advance some vital pieces of legislation into 2016. Thank you for your advocacy efforts this session!

Senate Bill 320 & House Bill 3265: CPR in Schools
This requires all high school students to be proficient in hands-only CPR and AED as part of the already required high school health education class. The bills received favorable reports with amendments from both the House and Senate Education Committees, and each bill passed its respective body with unanimous support. However, no further action was taken once each bill passed into the opposite body.

Senate Bill 484: School Nutrition Guidelines
This ensures schools are meeting nutritional standards set by the USDA and that standards are regularly updated with USDA guidelines. It also helps parents understand how schools are meeting nutrition standards by reporting compliance in existing school health improvement plans. S 484 passed the Senate during the last week of May and will be ready for consideration by the House next year.

Send a letter to your Representative to urge them to support Senate Bill 484

Tobacco Control Funding:
We advocated during the appropriations process for an additional $6 million in tobacco control funding from the Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement. We were able to protect the $5 million in funding for tobacco control received yearly from cigarette tax revenue.

Smoke-Free Victories:
Two more communities across the state adopted smoke-free ordinances, bringing us to 60 South Carolina municipalities enjoying- smoke-free air!

As part of the You’re the Cure team, we made GREAT strides this year toward improving the lives of South Carolina citizens. We will be revisiting each of these issues in 2016 and have no doubt we will see major victories in the Palmetto State!

Thank you, sincerely, for all you do. You are our hero.

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