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Options for CPR and AED instruction in Schools

Thank you for your interest in training the next generation of lifesavers!  With your leadership, we can save more lives from the dangers of cardiac arrest in New York.  There are several low or no cost options for your school to consider for CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) and AED (automated external defibrillator) instruction.

Low Cost Option #1: CPR in Schools Training Kit™

Need a turnkey educational program to teach CPR with hands-on practice?               

The CPR in Schools Training Kit includes:

  • 10 Mini-Anne® Plus inflatable manikins
  • 10 kneel mats with carry bags
  • 10 practice-while-watching training DVDs (English & Spanish)
  • Hand pump for manikin inflation
  • 2 mesh collection and storage bags
  • Classroom carry bag
  • 50 replacement airways
  • 50 manikin wipes
  • 10 replacement face mask
  • Facilitator Guide
  • Lesson Plan
  • Online resources include: trainer webinar, tracking tool for numbers of students trained, facilitator training record, pre- and post-test, letter to parents, and printable certificate of completion
  • The CPR in Schools Training Kit is an all-in-one educational program for educators, school nurses and student leaders to train groups of students at once in a school setting. In one class period students will learn the core skills of CPR. The kit is reusable and can train hundreds of students.
  • Cost: $625

For more information or to order go to:  www.heart.org/cprinschools

Low Cost Option #2: Hands-Only CPR using the single CPR Anytime kit:

Each single CPR Anytime Kit includes:

  • Mini Anne® CPR Learning Manikin
  • CPR Skills Practice DVD (English & Spanish)
  • Adult CPR & AED Reminder Card
  • Mini Anne® replacement airway
  • Manikin Wipes
  • Cost: $38.50 per kit

CPR Anytime Kits are self-directed programs designed to teach the core skills of CPR in about 22 minutes. This self-directed DVD course teaches the core CPR and AED skills needed to recognize and take action during a cardiac arrest. On average, up to three people can learn from one kit. The kits can be used to train small groups and organizations.

For more information or to order go to:  www.cpranytime.org

No Cost Option #1:  Hands-Only CPR using online tools

  • Using existing school equipment (if school has access to a CPR manikin), students can simulate delivering compressions.
  • Video available at no-cost: http://www.handsonlycpr.org/
  • Hands-Only CPR Questions and Answers: http://www.handsonlycpr.org/faqs
  • Be the Beat is a website for teachers and school administrators that provides free tools and resources to help start and sustain CPR and AED programs in schools. Through this website, teachers can download free tools and resources to teach students the two simple steps to Hands-Only™ CPR.  http://bethebeat.heart.org

No Cost Option #2:  Partner with local EMS

Thanks to local EMS, some schools have received Hands-Only training for students at no cost to the school district.  There are many local ambulance services and other EMS organizations. 

https://www.health.ny.gov/professionals/ems/regional.htm

Tips for CPR and AED instruction in the classroom

What should be included in a school CPR training?

♥     Recognition of a possible cardiac arrest and calling 911.

♥     An opportunity for students to practice Hands-Only CPR (compressions).

♥     An awareness of the purpose of an AED and its ease and safety of use.

Suggested Materials (if not using a CPR Kit):

  • YouTube videos
  • CPR manikins  
  • Mats (such as gym mats, garden kneeling mats or yoga mats)
  • AED (Option of bringing students to the school AED)

Prior to class:

  • Inflate manikins.
  • Review any videos that will be used for classroom instruction.
  • Review the instructions provided with your AED (if an AED is available). 
  • If showing students the school AED, check with school officials to see if there is an alarm on the unit.  Some models have an alarm system if opened.
  • Place mat and manikins on the floor, move desks or tables as needed.  Students will kneel to perform compressions.  This is the ideal scenario for quality compression practice.
  • If manikins are placed on desks, students shall stand to perform compressions.

Lesson Plan:

Review why CPR is important:

  • Every hour in the U.S., 38 people will have a sudden cardiac arrest.
  • Sadly, about 90 percent of victims die most likely because they don’t receive timely CPR.
  • A victim’s best chance at survival is receiving bystander CPR until EMTs arrive. 
  • Given right away, CPR doubles or triples survival rates.  

Demonstrate the steps for CPR or show video:

Students are given a demonstration on the steps of Hands-Only CPR.

http://www.handsonlycpr.org/

Students are instructed on AED use.

Divide students into small groups:

Act out the scenario “if someone sees an adult or teen suddenly collapse”. Students can take turns performing compressions.  Remind students to:

  • Check for responsiveness.
  • Call 9-1-1 and tell someone to get the AED.
  • If no signs of life, begin CPR compressions.  Pushing at least 2 inches deep, 100 compressions a minute. 

 To keep students engaged:

  • One student takes the lead and performs compressions. Have students perform 100 compressions in a minute.
  • One student simulates calling 9-1-1.
  • One student simulates going to get an AED if in a public place.

Have music? 

Choose songs that have 100 beats per minute such as “Stayin’ Alive” by the Bee Gees.  For more song ideas, go to the Spotify list located at www.handsonlycpr.org.  Remind students to “Push Hard and Fast” to save a life.

Other videos:

Hands-Only CPR video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8iU3Mtblho&list=PL7A68846B17049716

Keep the beat, Learn Hands-Only CPR video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjKeTo3c2wM

Ken Jeong AHA Hands-Only video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5hP4DIBCEE

AEDs

What is an AED?

An automated external defibrillator (AED) is a computerized medical device. An AED can check a person’s heart rhythm. It can recognize a rhythm that requires a shock. An AED can advise when a shock is needed. The AED uses voice prompts, lights and text messages to tell the rescuer the steps to take.

AEDs are very accurate and easy to use. The AED will walk a person through use and determine if a shock is needed.

Where are they in our school? 

If you do not have an AED simulator, show the students the school’s AED.  Check with your school administration prior to demonstrating AED use with their device.  Remember, some models may have an alarm system if opened.

Discuss with the students how to use it and note many public places have AEDs.  Review the instructions provided with your AED

 In an emergency, you will need to:

  • TURN ON AED
  • Remove clothes from chest and apply pads.
  • Must stand clear of AED while analyzing (if needed push analyze button).
  • If shock is advised, tell everyone to stand clear.
  • Once clear, press shock button. 

Medical Emergency Response Plan

This lesson also presents a good opportunity to review the schools Medical Emergency Response Plan.

 

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Dana Powell

Dana Powell, Mid-Atlantic Affiliate

On January 1, 2012, our family began the year with the birth of our second son, Asa Heard Karchmer. Like all babies, Asa delivered love and wonder into our lives. But those dreams were abruptly shattered on day two of Asa’s life. We came home from Watauga Medical Center in Boone, North Carolina and very soon realized Asa was struggling to breathe. We rushed back to the ER, then a few hours later, my husband and I followed the NeoNatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) transport team as it rushed Asa to Brenner Children’s Hospital in Wake Forest, NC. In the ambulance, Asa received oxygen, IV infusions of antibiotics and antivirals for a possible infections, and prostaglandins to treat a possible cardiac condition. No one was sure what was causing our baby’s medical emergency. Asa was in a state of shock when he arrived at the NICU at 2:00am on January 3 and we were uncertain whether or not he would survive the rest of the night.

By late morning, Asa’s clinical picture started to become clearer. A pediatric cardiologist confirmed that Asa was born with a very special heart – one which, anatomically speaking, worked just fine in utero but couldn’t make the transition to this world without serious medical intervention. His diagnosis was a congenital heart defect known generally as coarctation of the aortic arch (or more specifically as an interrupted aortic arch): a severe constriction of the main artery leading from the left ventricle of the heart and delivering blood to the entire body. It is among the more common types of cardiac defects among newborns and is often accompanied by other cardiac defects (in Asa’s case, a ventricular septal defect, or VSD, and a bicuspid valve). The cardiologist explained that this particular defect was not a problem in utero where there is a bypass shunt (called the PDA) between the pulmonary artery and the aorta, connecting below the arch and the coarctation. This duct began to close a day or two after birth, as it does in all babies. Yet in Asa’s heart, as the PDA closed, the coarctation prevented blood flow to most of his body, putting him into severe crisis.

We sat anxiously for a week with Asa in the NICU, enduring what seemed like an endless battery of tests on his fragile body (spinal tap, EEG, extensive blood work, MRI, etc.) until he was stable enough for heart surgery. So when he was just one week old, Asa underwent open heart surgery to repair the coarctation and VSD. His chest was left open for four more days to accommodate internal swelling but otherwise, Asa pulled through like a superstar. A miracle. In another three weeks, he was nursing well and we finally took him home to his older brother, and friends, in the mountains where we live.

Our experience with Asa’s newborn cardiac crisis gave us emotional and spiritual resources that we would draw upon again, six months later, when he developed Infantile Spasms, a fairly rare and frequently devastating form of childhood epilepsy. Although Asa’s epilepsy remains a daily battle, he is now a lively 3 ½ year old, with a strong and caring heart. He is now the middle of three brothers, each unique, yet Asa’s more difficult journey has deepened and strengthened our own hearts, along with the hearts of everyone who knows him.

Blog content provided by Dana Powell, mother of Asa, and You’re the Cure Advocate

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Summer has arrived in Montana and it's heating up at the AHA

Guest Blogger: Amanda Cahill, Montana Government Relations Director

Summer is officially here and the American Heart Association has big plans!  We are continuing our work to help build a healthier Montana and we wanted to let you know about just a few of the things we have going on.

Events in Montana

Missoula hosted the first HeartChase in Montana on the evening of June 23rd at the University of Montana. This signature event brought families and teams of friends together to compete in heart healthy challenges while racing each other to the finish line. With the support of the Missoula community, we are working harder than ever to hit our 2020 goal: To improve the cardiovascular health of all American by 20% while reducing deaths from cardiovascular diseases and stroke by 20%.  

Missoula Go Red is hosting its first Executive Leadership Team Meeting hosted by the 2016 Chair, Kimberly Roth of Merrill Lynch, to kick-off Go Red for Women 2016 in July.

Mission: Lifeline Montana Grant Project

Are Montanans more likely to die from a heart attack than those living in urban settings?  Unfortunately, the answer is yes which is why the American Heart Association/ American Stroke Association has engaged in a 3 year, 5 million dollar project to improve cardiac care across Montana.  Mission: Lifeline Montana has been providing new equipment, education, and other resources around the state to make sure that our parents, friends, and neighbors receive the best treatment possible.  For more information on this life-saving project, visit www.heart.org/missionlifelinemontana

CPR Education

Did you know that 70% of Montanans DON’T KNOW CPR?  The American Heart Association/ American Stroke Association is hoping to change that.  We are launching a grassroots effort across the state to ensure that kids are taught CPR in school.  By providing a fun, interactive Hands Only CPR training our Montana students can become life savers. 

I hope you have a great summer and if you want to learn more about any of these issues please contact me, Amanda Cahill at Amanda.cahill@heart.org

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Be CPR Smart this Summer

The temperatures are rising in Arizona, and along with it comes lazy days in the pool.  It’s this time of year that we are especially reminded how important it is to know how to respond in an emergency cardiac event.  4 out of 5 cardiac emergencies occur outside of a hospital setting, and roughly only 10% of victims survive the event.  But immediate application of Hands-Only CPR can double or triple survival rates.

Hands Only CPR takes only 2 minutes to learn, and has only 2 steps.  1) Call 9-1-1 and 2) Push hard and fast in the center of the chest at 100 beats per minute.  This is the same as the rhythm in the popular song by the Bee Gee’s “Stayin’ Alive.” 

Each year, in Arizona around 5,000 people die from sudden cardiac arrest and primarily because they did not get timely bystander CPR.  Why not take two minutes this summer to learn Hands Only CPR? The life you save may be the life of someone you love.

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Looking Back at Our Year Together!

The 2015 Legislative session in South Carolina was a lively one, allowing us to advance some vital pieces of legislation into 2016. Thank you for your advocacy efforts this session!

Senate Bill 320 & House Bill 3265: CPR in Schools
This requires all high school students to be proficient in hands-only CPR and AED as part of the already required high school health education class. The bills received favorable reports with amendments from both the House and Senate Education Committees, and each bill passed its respective body with unanimous support. However, no further action was taken once each bill passed into the opposite body.

Senate Bill 484: School Nutrition Guidelines
This ensures schools are meeting nutritional standards set by the USDA and that standards are regularly updated with USDA guidelines. It also helps parents understand how schools are meeting nutrition standards by reporting compliance in existing school health improvement plans. S 484 passed the Senate during the last week of May and will be ready for consideration by the House next year.

Send a letter to your Representative to urge them to support Senate Bill 484

Tobacco Control Funding:
We advocated during the appropriations process for an additional $6 million in tobacco control funding from the Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement. We were able to protect the $5 million in funding for tobacco control received yearly from cigarette tax revenue.

Smoke-Free Victories:
Two more communities across the state adopted smoke-free ordinances, bringing us to 60 South Carolina municipalities enjoying- smoke-free air!

As part of the You’re the Cure team, we made GREAT strides this year toward improving the lives of South Carolina citizens. We will be revisiting each of these issues in 2016 and have no doubt we will see major victories in the Palmetto State!

Thank you, sincerely, for all you do. You are our hero.

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Supreme Court Rules For the Affordable Care Act

We live in exciting times. While most of the time, the American Heart Association works with our You’re the Cure advocates on legislative issues, recently the AHA (with several other non-profit health organizations) was able to inform Americans across the country that their access to health care had been upheld by the Supreme Court through a ruling on the Affordable Care Act, directly through the court case King v Burwell.

In January, the AHA and other organizations (including the American Cancer Society & ACS Cancer Action Network, the American Diabetes Association, and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society) submitted a brief that urged the Supreme Court to rule the original intention of Congress had been to make tax credits for health insurance available to all, not just residents of states that decided to participate in a state health insurance exchange.

The King v Burwell ruling means that residents of states which had previously opted to participate in a federal health insurance exchange will be able to continue to benefit from tax credits for the health insurance they have chosen. Consequently, Americans who participate in the insurance exchange and are eligible will be able to expect tax credits for their policies [this does not affect those who currently receive insurance through their employers].

What does this mean for cardiovascular and stroke? Two facts worth noting for those who are uninsured:

  • Uninsured patients with cardiovascular disease experience higher mortality rates and poorer blood pressure control than the insured.
  • Uninsured people who suffer the most common type of stroke have greater neurological impairments, longer hospital stays and up to a 56 percent higher risk of death than the insured.

American Heart Association President Nancy Brown had this to say in her statement reflecting on the court’s ruling: "We commend the Court for not halting premium tax credits in the federal marketplaces, enabling an estimated 6.4 million people in 34 states to keep the assistance that makes their health insurance affordable. As a result, these patients can continue to focus on their healing and recovery, instead of worrying about losing their coverage and care. Now that the Affordable Care Act has survived two major Supreme Court challenges, it’s time for our nation to concentrate on improving the law and enrolling as many uninsured Americans as possible so everyone can receive the quality health and preventive care they need."

History is made every day, and we are thankful for our advocates who help us change our communities for the better.

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School is out for the summer, but the AHA is still looking out for students

Guest Blogger: Erin Bennett, Idaho Government Relations Director

The days keep getting hotter, and we are on fire, working hard to prepare for all the exciting things we will be doing this fall!

In 2014, we worked to pass CPR in Schools Legislation that will be implemented when school starts this fall. This means that every student starting as a freshman in Idaho schools will learn hands-only CPR before they graduate. That’s thousands of lifesavers being added to the Idaho population each year! We are now in the process of helping teachers and schools find easy ways to implement this new requirement and working with area first responders and others to make sure they are trained and ready.

In addition to our CPR in schools efforts, we’re also focusing on the importance of quality physical education (PE) classes and nutritious food options. We’ll be talking to advocates around the state to help support these efforts, with a focus on cultivating youth advocates. We want to hear from Idaho’s students!

Also, if there is a great PE program or school garden in your community or you walk or bike to school every day to stay active, we want you on our team!  We are in the process of identifying advocates across the state that are interested in talking to their Legislators and other community leaders about how we can be healthier throughout the school day. So if you know someone in school that wants to improve their PE and nutrition programs, we want to hear from you and potentially have you join us for our Youth Advocacy Day at the Capitol in January.  

We’ve got a lot more great things getting warmed up in advocacy, so stay tuned. But in the meantime, keep cool out there- I suggest taking a few laps in the pool to cool off, stay active, and have fun all at the same time!

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Julien Comardelle - A Simple, Lifesaving Endeavor

My name is Julien Comardelle and I’m a student at West Linn High School. 

As a volunteer alongside Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue, I have had the opportunity to go to my former middle school, Athey Creek, and teach the seventh grade class the simple but extremely important basics of CPR.

CPR is a very simple and easy-to-learn skill that unfortunately, few people feel the need to learn. Teaching CPR is a very simple endeavor. The students I have had the pleasure of working with have been very attentive during the lessons and focused during the applied exercises.

If students in Oregon are trained in CPR, there is now a greater chance that a person experiencing cardiac arrest will have access to CPR and survive. The current national average for survival for out of hospital cardiac arrest in 2014 was only 10.4% according to the American Heart Association.

CPR education is personally very important to me because my father had Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and he developed cardiac complications after chemotherapy.  In summer 2012 he had a cardiac arrest at home.  He was successfully resuscitated on the floor of our living room and that prolonged his life by two more years. As soon as my age permitted, I got fully CPR-certified. 

In my freshman year of high school I performed a research project for the Intel Science and Engineering Fair which compared CPR certification rates between Oregon and Louisiana. It was at the fair that I was approached by Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue and introduced to the project, which I am so honored to be a part of.

 Anyone can save a life and everyone should know how.

Julien testified on Senate Bill 79 in May 2015. Thanks to advocates like Julien, soon after, the bill passed the Oregon Legislature, requiring all students learn CPR before graduating.

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The 2015 Oahu Heart and Stroke Walk is just around the corner

The Heart & Stroke Walk celebrates those who have made lifestyle changes and encourages many more to take the pledge to live healthier lifestyles while raising the dollars needed to fund life-saving research and initiatives in our local community.

Come walk with us Saturday, August 8th at Kapi`olani Park. The festival opens at 6:30 a.m. and the Walk kicks off at 7:30 a.m.




This free family event includes:

  • A health fair & preventative screenings
  • Kids' Zone
  • CPR training
  • FREE heart-healthy snacks & beverages!

Create a Community Team!  Each year more than 3,200 people in Hawaii die from heart disease. There’s still time to recruit friends and family to walk with you and raise money for a great cause.

Be sure to stop by the advocacy booth and sign a postcard in support of adding CPR training in Hawaii high schools. If you are interesting in helping at the advocacy booth please click here to email Don Weisman.

We hope to see you on August 8th!

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