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Options for CPR and AED instruction in Schools

Thank you for your interest in training the next generation of lifesavers!  With your leadership, we can save more lives from the dangers of cardiac arrest in New York.  There are several low or no cost options for your school to consider for CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) and AED (automated external defibrillator) instruction.

Low Cost Option #1: CPR in Schools Training Kit™

Need a turnkey educational program to teach CPR with hands-on practice?               

The CPR in Schools Training Kit includes:

  • 10 Mini-Anne® Plus inflatable manikins
  • 10 kneel mats with carry bags
  • 10 practice-while-watching training DVDs (English & Spanish)
  • Hand pump for manikin inflation
  • 2 mesh collection and storage bags
  • Classroom carry bag
  • 50 replacement airways
  • 50 manikin wipes
  • 10 replacement face mask
  • Facilitator Guide
  • Lesson Plan
  • Online resources include: trainer webinar, tracking tool for numbers of students trained, facilitator training record, pre- and post-test, letter to parents, and printable certificate of completion
  • The CPR in Schools Training Kit is an all-in-one educational program for educators, school nurses and student leaders to train groups of students at once in a school setting. In one class period students will learn the core skills of CPR. The kit is reusable and can train hundreds of students.
  • Cost: $625

For more information or to order go to:  www.heart.org/cprinschools

Low Cost Option #2: Hands-Only CPR using the single CPR Anytime kit:

Each single CPR Anytime Kit includes:

  • Mini Anne® CPR Learning Manikin
  • CPR Skills Practice DVD (English & Spanish)
  • Adult CPR & AED Reminder Card
  • Mini Anne® replacement airway
  • Manikin Wipes
  • Cost: $38.50 per kit

CPR Anytime Kits are self-directed programs designed to teach the core skills of CPR in about 22 minutes. This self-directed DVD course teaches the core CPR and AED skills needed to recognize and take action during a cardiac arrest. On average, up to three people can learn from one kit. The kits can be used to train small groups and organizations.

For more information or to order go to:  www.cpranytime.org

No Cost Option #1:  Hands-Only CPR using online tools

  • Using existing school equipment (if school has access to a CPR manikin), students can simulate delivering compressions.
  • Video available at no-cost: http://www.handsonlycpr.org/
  • Hands-Only CPR Questions and Answers: http://www.handsonlycpr.org/faqs
  • Be the Beat is a website for teachers and school administrators that provides free tools and resources to help start and sustain CPR and AED programs in schools. Through this website, teachers can download free tools and resources to teach students the two simple steps to Hands-Only™ CPR.  http://bethebeat.heart.org

No Cost Option #2:  Partner with local EMS

Thanks to local EMS, some schools have received Hands-Only training for students at no cost to the school district.  There are many local ambulance services and other EMS organizations. 

https://www.health.ny.gov/professionals/ems/regional.htm

Tips for CPR and AED instruction in the classroom

What should be included in a school CPR training?

♥     Recognition of a possible cardiac arrest and calling 911.

♥     An opportunity for students to practice Hands-Only CPR (compressions).

♥     An awareness of the purpose of an AED and its ease and safety of use.

Suggested Materials (if not using a CPR Kit):

  • YouTube videos
  • CPR manikins  
  • Mats (such as gym mats, garden kneeling mats or yoga mats)
  • AED (Option of bringing students to the school AED)

Prior to class:

  • Inflate manikins.
  • Review any videos that will be used for classroom instruction.
  • Review the instructions provided with your AED (if an AED is available). 
  • If showing students the school AED, check with school officials to see if there is an alarm on the unit.  Some models have an alarm system if opened.
  • Place mat and manikins on the floor, move desks or tables as needed.  Students will kneel to perform compressions.  This is the ideal scenario for quality compression practice.
  • If manikins are placed on desks, students shall stand to perform compressions.

Lesson Plan:

Review why CPR is important:

  • Every hour in the U.S., 38 people will have a sudden cardiac arrest.
  • Sadly, about 90 percent of victims die most likely because they don’t receive timely CPR.
  • A victim’s best chance at survival is receiving bystander CPR until EMTs arrive. 
  • Given right away, CPR doubles or triples survival rates.  

Demonstrate the steps for CPR or show video:

Students are given a demonstration on the steps of Hands-Only CPR.

http://www.handsonlycpr.org/

Students are instructed on AED use.

Divide students into small groups:

Act out the scenario “if someone sees an adult or teen suddenly collapse”. Students can take turns performing compressions.  Remind students to:

  • Check for responsiveness.
  • Call 9-1-1 and tell someone to get the AED.
  • If no signs of life, begin CPR compressions.  Pushing at least 2 inches deep, 100 compressions a minute. 

 To keep students engaged:

  • One student takes the lead and performs compressions. Have students perform 100 compressions in a minute.
  • One student simulates calling 9-1-1.
  • One student simulates going to get an AED if in a public place.

Have music? 

Choose songs that have 100 beats per minute such as “Stayin’ Alive” by the Bee Gees.  For more song ideas, go to the Spotify list located at www.handsonlycpr.org.  Remind students to “Push Hard and Fast” to save a life.

Other videos:

Hands-Only CPR video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8iU3Mtblho&list=PL7A68846B17049716

Keep the beat, Learn Hands-Only CPR video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjKeTo3c2wM

Ken Jeong AHA Hands-Only video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5hP4DIBCEE

AEDs

What is an AED?

An automated external defibrillator (AED) is a computerized medical device. An AED can check a person’s heart rhythm. It can recognize a rhythm that requires a shock. An AED can advise when a shock is needed. The AED uses voice prompts, lights and text messages to tell the rescuer the steps to take.

AEDs are very accurate and easy to use. The AED will walk a person through use and determine if a shock is needed.

Where are they in our school? 

If you do not have an AED simulator, show the students the school’s AED.  Check with your school administration prior to demonstrating AED use with their device.  Remember, some models may have an alarm system if opened.

Discuss with the students how to use it and note many public places have AEDs.  Review the instructions provided with your AED

 In an emergency, you will need to:

  • TURN ON AED
  • Remove clothes from chest and apply pads.
  • Must stand clear of AED while analyzing (if needed push analyze button).
  • If shock is advised, tell everyone to stand clear.
  • Once clear, press shock button. 

Medical Emergency Response Plan

This lesson also presents a good opportunity to review the schools Medical Emergency Response Plan.

 

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Advocate Spotlight - Libby Char

Libby Char, Hawaii

Despite her extremely busy work schedule as an emergency physician, as the Medical Director for the Honolulu Fire Department and for American Medical Response in Hawaii, and serving on the American Heart Association Hawaii Division Board, Libby Char, M.D. still finds time to support American Heart Association policy efforts to make Hawaii healthier.

She sees the value of using policy change as a way to more quickly and efficiently change public norms that will result in improved public health.  Dr. Char has supported our efforts this year to require all newborns to be screened for congenital heart defects, requiring all high school students to receive CPR training prior to graduation, and development of policy aimed at improving Hawaii’s stroke system of care. 

As an example of her commitment, Dr. Char serves as the AHA’s volunteer representative on the Hawaii State Stroke Coalition which worked on successfully passing state legislation that will result in the creation of a state stroke data registry. Requiring that all of Hawaii’s acute stroke care hospitals collect stroke patient data and submit that data to the state Department of Health (DOH), the DOH will then create data reports that the Coalition will use to identify areas of weakness in the state’s stroke system of care and work together to improve them. The ongoing effort is expected to reduce geographic disparities in levels of care and improve stroke patients’ health outcomes.

Stroke remains the third leading cause of death in Hawaii, while nationally it has fallen to the fifth leading killer. It is also Hawaii’s leading cause of major disability. Efforts in other states, similar to those underway in Hawaii, to improve stroke systems of care have been credited with the reduction in stroke deaths nationally.  Coupled with the implementation of new stroke treatment guidelines released by the AHA in June, and the AHA’s ongoing efforts to boost stroke prevention through lifestyle changes, the long-term outlook for stroke patients and their families in Hawaii are looking brighter.

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Looking Back at Our Year Together!

The 2015 Legislative session in South Carolina was a lively one, allowing us to advance some vital pieces of legislation into 2016. Thank you for your advocacy efforts this session!

Senate Bill 320 & House Bill 3265: CPR in Schools
This requires all high school students to be proficient in hands-only CPR and AED as part of the already required high school health education class. The bills received favorable reports with amendments from both the House and Senate Education Committees, and each bill passed its respective body with unanimous support. However, no further action was taken once each bill passed into the opposite body.

Senate Bill 484: School Nutrition Guidelines
This ensures schools are meeting nutritional standards set by the USDA and that standards are regularly updated with USDA guidelines. It also helps parents understand how schools are meeting nutrition standards by reporting compliance in existing school health improvement plans. S 484 passed the Senate during the last week of May and will be ready for consideration by the House next year.

Send a letter to your Representative to urge them to support Senate Bill 484

Tobacco Control Funding:
We advocated during the appropriations process for an additional $6 million in tobacco control funding from the Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement. We were able to protect the $5 million in funding for tobacco control received yearly from cigarette tax revenue.

Smoke-Free Victories:
Two more communities across the state adopted smoke-free ordinances, bringing us to 60 South Carolina municipalities enjoying- smoke-free air!

As part of the You’re the Cure team, we made GREAT strides this year toward improving the lives of South Carolina citizens. We will be revisiting each of these issues in 2016 and have no doubt we will see major victories in the Palmetto State!

Thank you, sincerely, for all you do. You are our hero.

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Supreme Court Rules For the Affordable Care Act

We live in exciting times. While most of the time, the American Heart Association works with our You’re the Cure advocates on legislative issues, recently the AHA (with several other non-profit health organizations) was able to inform Americans across the country that their access to health care had been upheld by the Supreme Court through a ruling on the Affordable Care Act, directly through the court case King v Burwell.

In January, the AHA and other organizations (including the American Cancer Society & ACS Cancer Action Network, the American Diabetes Association, and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society) submitted a brief that urged the Supreme Court to rule the original intention of Congress had been to make tax credits for health insurance available to all, not just residents of states that decided to participate in a state health insurance exchange.

The King v Burwell ruling means that residents of states which had previously opted to participate in a federal health insurance exchange will be able to continue to benefit from tax credits for the health insurance they have chosen. Consequently, Americans who participate in the insurance exchange and are eligible will be able to expect tax credits for their policies [this does not affect those who currently receive insurance through their employers].

What does this mean for cardiovascular and stroke? Two facts worth noting for those who are uninsured:

  • Uninsured patients with cardiovascular disease experience higher mortality rates and poorer blood pressure control than the insured.
  • Uninsured people who suffer the most common type of stroke have greater neurological impairments, longer hospital stays and up to a 56 percent higher risk of death than the insured.

American Heart Association President Nancy Brown had this to say in her statement reflecting on the court’s ruling: "We commend the Court for not halting premium tax credits in the federal marketplaces, enabling an estimated 6.4 million people in 34 states to keep the assistance that makes their health insurance affordable. As a result, these patients can continue to focus on their healing and recovery, instead of worrying about losing their coverage and care. Now that the Affordable Care Act has survived two major Supreme Court challenges, it’s time for our nation to concentrate on improving the law and enrolling as many uninsured Americans as possible so everyone can receive the quality health and preventive care they need."

History is made every day, and we are thankful for our advocates who help us change our communities for the better.

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Heart Saver Spotlight: Skylar Berry

Every year there are almost 424,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in the United States, and of this figure an estimated 10,200 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests happen to children.  Sadly, only 10% of victims who suffer a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital setting survive, largely in part because many victims do not receive timely CPR or AED application. 

Do you know CPR? If not, please take two minutes to learn the basics of Hands-Only CPR.

Skylar Berry can attest to the importance of knowing CPR.  In the summer, Skylar and her friends were at a birthday party and one of the attendees was found floating at the bottom of the pool, seemingly lifeless.  Thankfully, Skylar recognized that her classmate was not joking and not breathing and helped pull him from the pool. She checked his pulse, and then realized CPR might be the last resort to reviving her classmate.  Because of her immediate actions, her classmate survived and was back to life as normal within a few days. 

Thankfully Skylar learned CPR techniques in Fire Camp hosted by the Sacramento Metro Fire Department a few weeks prior to the incident.  “I am so glad I learned CPR because it helped save my friend’s life,” said Berry. “It was scary but I was calm and remembered the training I received. I just shouted to the adults to Call 9-1-1 and immediately started doing CPR after we pulled him from the pool.”

Unfortunately, 70% of Americans feel helpless to act during an emergency cardiac situations and only 32% of cardiac arrest victims receive bystander CPR, which largely attributes to low survival rates.

To view the full story, please visit here.

Studies show that teaching students lifesaving skills of CPR techniques in school will empower our youth and put thousands of lifesavers in our community.  Keeping this in mind, Skylar now teaches groups of students at her elementary school Hands-only CPR because she knows that emergency situations can happen at any time and she wants to do her part to put more lifesavers on the streets of her community.

Thank you Skylar for being a Heart Saver and for going above the call of duty to empower your classmates to learn Hands-Only CPR!

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Students in Connecticut Will Learn CPR before they Graduate

Thanks to our advocates hard work and dedication Governor Malloy signed a bill on June 23rd requiring all schools to include CPR as part of the health and safety curriculum. Connecticut students will now have direct access to sensible and affordable training that will equip them with the lifesaving skills necessary to administer CPR if they encounter someone experiencing sudden cardiac arrest. So far, 23 states across the country have passed laws requiring every high school student to be CPR-trained before graduation, and it’s paying off. Graduates from just one school in Long Island, N.Y., have saved 16 lives since being trained. Congratulations on making Connecticut the 24rd state to require CPR training before graduation. I’m proud of all your hard work and you should be too.

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Vermont Heart Walk to Highlight the Team Effort that Saved a Local Coach!

Vermont advocates pushed for passage of legislation in 2012 that required schools to teach students Hands-only CPR and the importance of an AED (automated external defibrillator). Its efforts like these that have raised awareness to the need for public access to defibrillation and a strong chain of survival. Many schools now have AEDs on hand, including at sporting events.

It’s a good thing. The American Heart Association’s Vermont Heart Walk on September 26th will highlight the successful effort that saved the life of Rice High School Girls’ Basketball Coach Tim Rice from a cardiac arrest during a game against CVU this winter. The CVU team had the foresight to bring their AED to the game with them. That AED, along with many quick actions from bystanders and EMS enabled the coach to give a thumbs up as he left the game instead of much worse outcome.

We’ll honor Cardiologist Ed Terrien, who performed CPR on Coach Rice that day. Join Dr. Terrien and hundreds of others walking at the Vermont Heart Walk at Oakledge Park in Burlington on September 26th to raise funds for life-saving research.

There will also be Heart Walks on September 12th in Swanton and September 19th in Berlin. You can register for any of the walks at www.vermontheartwalk.org. Do it today and make a commitment to save lives. Get your friends and family together for a great day and a great cause!

You can also ensure that your community and school have a strong chain of survival by contacting your local high school and asking if the school has an AED and making sure students are CPR-trained.

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A New World Record!

The American Heart Association took over Times Square in New York City to set a new Guinness World Record - for the longest running set of consecutive chest compressions in a CPR Relay.  It was a powerful day highlighting the real reasons why CPR training matters.  The designation as a new Guinness World Record required that at least 250 people had to perform quality chest compressions in the relay. In the end, over 700 participated including survivors, clinicians, paramedics, teachers, students, families impacted by sudden cardiac arrest and more! 

The American Heart Association hosted the event in New York City as part of National CPR & AED Awareness Week. Relay participants each took a turn performing at least 60 chest compressions at 100 beats per minute on a single mannequin, with five seconds or less between turns.

Lawrence Phillips, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at NYU Langone Medical Center and the visionary leader of this event, was No. 250 in the relay, officially setting the world record.  In true New York fashion, we then obliterated the record by achieving 700 total participants!

The AHA also presented its New York Region Heartsaver Hero Awards at the event. The distinguished awards are presented to those who have directly attempted to rescue a victim of cardiac arrest or otherwise helped to strengthen the Chain of Survival.

Congratulations to each of our award winners:

Jim Palmer

Marcy Syms

Patti Kenner

Jerry Kertesz of the Anthem Foundation

KKR & Co., LP

Karen and John Acompora

Joe Mendrick

JJ Pesany

Annette Adamczak

Sue Denis

Consulado General De México en Nueva York

Jody Scopa Goldman

James M. Horowitz, MD

Steve Tannenbaum

Lynne Strong-Shinozaki

Dave Gill

Tommy Watson

Fire Department of New York

Brandon Johnson, MD 

Nicholas Farber, MD

Lawrence M. Phillips, MD

*Photo by Angie Harrison

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We Are One Step Closer to Creating a Generation of Lifesavers in CT!

We have made it to the final step to requiring all students in Connecticut to know CPR before the graduate! The Senate and the House both passed the bill in late May and now it goes to the Governor! Your advocacy has truly made a difference!  Effective CPR training takes less than the amount of time to watch a typical 30 minute TV sitcom.  We can help add hundreds of trained rescuers across the State every few years by training all middle and high school students. Those students will be ready, willing and able to act and save lives for years to come, if they witness an emergency within their community. We are excited to ensure that the Governor signs this critical lifesaving legislation. If you want to reach out and help, please email me at Allyson.perron@heart.org and we can give you everything you need!

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Rich Greene, A Stroke Survivor with Heart

On January 14, 2009, Rich got up bright and early as usual -  5:00 a.m.  When he left for work, he felt something was off and thought perhaps it was dehydration. Soon after he had a headache. Then tired. He went to a walk-in clinic and was told it was a migraine.  That night, he began thrashing around. Just 48, Rich was having a stroke.

The  right side of his body was paralyzed.  His mouth was drooping.  At the hospital, doctors were not sure Rich would survive. Now, this stroke hero is sharing his story with others and advocating for the best care for stroke patients.  Recently, Rich traveled to Albany for the first ever Stroke Awareness Advocacy Day at the Capitol.

Rich knows why immediate care is critical for stroke patients - he had to fight to learn how to walk, how to dress himself and how to speak again.  His voice is back - and he's using it to help others.  Rich shared his story with media and lawmakers.  And he urged lawmakers to support legislation that will establish three tiers of stroke centers in New York because all stroke victims deserve the best care.

Now that's a hero! 

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