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Join us on National Wear Red Day, Friday, February 5

The American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women are asking for your support by participating in National Wear Red Day® on Friday, February 5, 2016 and donating to help fund research during American Health Month.

Why Go Red? Heart disease and stroke cause 1 in 3 deaths among women each year, killing approximately one woman every 80 seconds.  Fortunately, we can change that because 80 percent of cardiac and stroke events may be prevented with education and action. That’s why this year we are asking that you wear red on National Wear Red Day® and donate to Go Red For Woman. By doing so you help support educational programs to increase women’s awareness and critical research to discover scientific knowledge about cardiovascular health. 

And don’t forget to make your heart health a priority. Schedule your Well-Woman Visit, a prevention check-up to review a woman’s overall health so her doctor can measure blood pressure, check cholesterol and look for signs of heart disease, stroke and other illnesses. Then encourage others through your social channels to do the same.

We couldn’t make positive changes without the support and donations by individuals like you.

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Share Your Story-Toni Reel

Toni Reel

As a child, I was told my only option to live a normal life was to have open-heart surgery. My parents didn’t think this was the best solution for me, and became my biggest advocates. This is why I made a commitment to pay it forward and like my parents, I would be a voice for those who don’t have one –children.  Here is my story:

At age one, I was diagnosed with Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia (PSVT), and by age eight, I discovered I had another problem - Wolff–Parkinson–White Syndrome (WPW).  My heart produced irregular heartbeats. During an episode, my resting heartrate would run 150 to 200 or upwards of 300 beats per minute. My case was difficult to control because attacks occurred frequent - a couple times a week was normal for me. I was hospitalized often for various reasons either for heart procedures or for monitoring of new drug therapies. One side effect of a drug caused me to go into a diabetic coma. My doctors told me that eventually I would need open-heart surgery. Even though my episodes were often, my doctors agreed this surgery could be delayed. My parents made sure I saw the top cardiologist, remained current on new cardiovascular advancements, and encouraged me to live a normal, active lifestyle; swimming, playing tennis and running. They were my voice when others simply did not listen to me.    

My heart became a barrier as I got older, and I was eager to have my heart problem fixed. So, at age 17, my parents looked into a new non-invasive surgery: Cardiac Ablation.  Still being studied, this heart procedure was available at two locations; University of Oklahoma and the University of Michigan. I would later learn that this breakthrough heart surgery was initially funded by an American Heart Association research grant. 

During the summer of 1991, Dr. Fred Morady, cardiologist with the University of Michigan, performed my first cardiac ablation. The procedure was difficult because a good pathway was wrapped around a bad one, like licorice.  One nick on the good pathway, and I would forever be on a pacemaker. The procedure was a success, and I still remember Dr. Morady telling me he fixed it. My reaction: tears. A week later, I participated in a week-long intensive tennis camp.

Ten years after this procedure, I discovered I had another irregular heart rhythm, so I underwent my second heart ablation at Washington University in St. Louis. My recovery was quick, but unfortunately, it didn’t completely fix the irregular heart rhythm. I consider this a blessing, though, because these extra beats tell me when I need to pay attention to my body: manage my stress, eat healthy, and exercise.

I am so grateful to my parents for ensuring I had access to the best healthcare, my cardiologists and medical staff who took great care of me, and the American Heart Association for funding the exploratory heart procedure that forever changed my life. From an early age, I knew I wanted to have children, and so it has been my greatest gift that I became a mom to my son, Peyton (11), and my daughter, Phoebe (7). The bonus is they are healthy, smart, and active kids. 

Just as my parents did for me, I want to be the voice for others. That is why I volunteer for the American Heart Association’s You’re the Cure advocacy initiatives and advocate for heart health for all children. We have come a long way, but there is still a lot of work that needs to be done to make sure our children grow up to be healthy, active adults.

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Get Social With Your Members of Congress

Will you be on Facebook or Twitter today? Your Members of Congress and their staff will be, and it's a good place to reach them according to a report released in October by the Congressional Management Foundation (CMF).

The CMF report, #SocialCongress, says Congressional offices are listening to social media chatter and it takes relatively few posts or comments to get their attention. That's good news for us!

So, how can you use the Facebook newsfeed or Twitter timeline to get the attention of lawmakers and help pass heart healthy policies?

  • Follow your members of Congress, as well as state and local elected officials on Twitter. ‘Like’ and ‘Follow’ their pages on Facebook.
  • Tweet about our health policy issues, tagging the appropriate legislators by using the @ sign and their Twitter handle. For example: I’m from Pennsylvania, so I’d tag my U.S. Senators by including @SenBobCasey & @SenToomey in my tweet.
  • If they allow it, you can post about our issues directly on the Facebook pages of elected officials. Frequently, that feature is disabled but you are able to comment on their posts. According to #SocialCongress, Congressional offices typically monitor those comments for a limited period of time. Your best bet is to comment within the first 24 hours after a post.
  • Rally your friends and family members to tweet, post or comment about an issue on a single ‘day of action’. CMF’s survey data shows just 30 or fewer comments can be enough to make a legislative office pay attention.
  • Be sure to use the campaign hashtag if one has been created by your advocacy staff partners. The #hashtag allows all the relevant posts to be woven together to tell our story, and makes your post searchable by others interested in the issue.    

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Share Your Story - Jan Frieb

Jan Frieb Kansas

Jan Frieb has taught CPR classes at Trinity Catholic High School for 24 years, but this year she’s the first instructor in South Central Kansas to use a new tool to teach the important skills to her students.

This American Heart Association (AHA) tool is called the "CPR in Schools Training Kit" and is a kit that the association is hoping to get into all Kansas high schools.

"They would like to make it a mandate for all high school kids before they graduate from high school to get certified and learn CPR skills," said Frieb, who teaches physical education at Trinity. "I believe about half of the states have a mandate in place-and Kansas is not one of them." Continue Reading

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Share Your Story: Volunteer Advocacy Summit-KS

Volunteer Advocacy Summit Kansas

Meet our top active, committed and hero volunteers that recently attended our "Advocacy Volunteer Summit, 2015". It has always been important to us to recognize and show them how thankful we are for their help in the fight against heart disease and stroke, so we decided to implement a new advocate recognition program.

Our goal is to give our top advocates an opportunity to network with others from across their state, get the inside scoop on our local and federal legislative efforts, allow us to share our mission and goals with them, work with them to help tell their stories in a quick and impactful way and help them gain an understanding of their role in the legislative process.

Another benefit to being a top advocate is that they receive access to our insider perks! Some of these perks include insider calls where they will get the inside scoop on what’s happening under the dome, invites to special events and trainings held throughout the year like our advocacy summits and first consideration to attend national events like our National Lobby Day on the Hill in Washington DC.

We had a fun and informative day at this year’s Advocacy Volunteer Summit! Hope you will be able to join us next year by earning points to become a top advocate. Here’s how.

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Share Your Story - Julie Rickman

Julie Rickman Kansas

American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women announced this year’s “Real Women,” national spokespeople for the cause, and one of the nine women selected is from Overland Park, Kansas.  Julie Rickman will join group members from across the country to share their personal stories, encouraging women to take a proactive role in their health by knowing their family history and scheduling a well-woman visit.

Rickman thought she was suffering from asthma when two days after Christmas she found herself in the ER with shortness of breath and fatigue. But after sharing her family history of heart disease, doctors ordered testing that revealed two blockages, requiring a stent, and evidence that Julie had a heart attack sometime during the past month.

“If you want to watch your children grow up, know your family history and share this information with your doctor at your Well-Women Visit. Your children want their mommy in their life,” Rickman says.

Heart disease and stroke cause 1 in 3 deaths among women each year, yet they are 80 percent preventable. One risk factor that cannot be prevented is family history.

According to a recent study in the American Journal of Medical Genetics, 95.7 percent of study respondents considered knowledge of family history important to their personal health, but only 36.9 percent reported actively collecting health information from their relatives.

“Heart disease is often said to be a silent killer. It is essential that our patients don’t remain silent as well. A patient who understands their family history and shares that information with their physician is able to paint a complete picture of their health in the exam room,” says Dr. Tracy Stevens, Medical Chair of Saint Luke’s Muriel I. Kauffman Women’s Heart Center. “That complete picture is vital for accurately diagnosing and treating heart disease before it’s too late.”

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Sing to End Stroke

One in three Americans can’t recall any stroke warning signs. What if singing a song could help people recognize a stroke and give someone the power to save a life?

On World Stroke Day, October 29th, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association is using music to help people remember the common warning signs of stroke, F.A.S.T. (Face drooping, Arm weakness, Speech difficulty, Time to call 9-1-1).

Why learn the F.A.S.T song? The quicker you recognize the stroke warning signs and call 9-1-1 for stroke, the better the chances of recovery. 

Here is how you can participate:

So get your vocal cords ready and let's sing to end stroke!

  

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Share Your Story: Wichita Sweethearts

Wichita Sweethearts Kansas

The American Heart Association Sweethearts are high school sophomores who (from September through June) actively participate in a program designed to teach them about heart healthy lifestyles and about the prevention of heart disease through education and volunteerism.

Through this program, these young ladies learn that heart disease is the number one killer of Americans. During their tenure as Sweethearts, they learn the goals of the American Heart Association and how to implement those goals on a daily basis.  Click here to learn more.

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September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month and to help raise awareness with families across the country, the American Heart Association has brought back a fun and easy way to help you with the No. 1 health concern among parents – childhood obesity. Through the Life is Why Family Health Challenge™  families and kids will learn to take control of their health in four weeks by pursuing a different goal each week with activities that are fun, simple, won’t break the bank and can be done as a family! By the end of the month, you might feel accomplished and be better equipped to live a heart-healthy life. There will also be four Life is Why Family Health Challenge™ Twitter Chats every Wednesday in September.

Mark your calendars and get ready to take the challenge in September by visiting www.heart.org/healthierkids - where you will have access to videos, complimentary challenge materials, and the Life is Why Family Health Challenge™ social media group that will help you, and your family, stay on track.  

 

 

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Step it Up! The Surgeon General Advocates the Benefits of Walkable Communities

We applaud the United States Surgeon General for recently issuing a call to action to address major public health challenges such as heart disease and diabetes. Step It Up! The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Promote Walking and Walkable Communities articulates the health benefits of walking while addressing the fact that many communities unacceptably lack safe and convenient places for individuals to walk or wheelchair roll.

Data consistently show there are safety and accessibility issues that make communities less walkable. A 2013 study by the U.S. Department of Transportation, for example, found that three out of every 10 Americans reported that no sidewalks existed along any streets in their neighborhood. In many communities violence – and the perception of violence – may prove a barrier to walking. 

“Everyone deserves to have a safe place to walk or wheelchair roll. But in too many of our communities, that is not the reality,” said Dr. Vivek H. Murthy, the 19th U.S. Surgeon General. “We know that an active lifestyle is critical to achieving good overall health. And walking is a simple, effective and affordable way to build physical activity into our lives. That is why we need to step it up as a country ensuring that everyone can choose to walk in their own communities.”

The Surgeon General calls on community planners and local leaders to create more areas for walking and wheelchair rolling and to prioritize the development of safe routes for children to get to and from schools. The call to action suggests that these designs should include sidewalks, curb cuts, crosswalks, safe crossings for the visually impaired and more green spaces. The Surgeon General further calls on city managers, law enforcement and community and public health leaders to address safety concerns by better maintaining public spaces, working with residents to promote a shared sense of community ownership, ensuring proper street lighting and fostering neighborhood watch programs.

The Surgeon General’s report discusses the health benefits of walking and calls on individuals to make walking a priority in their lives. Fewer than half of all U.S. adults get enough physical activity to reduce their risk of chronic disease, and only a quarter of high school students get the recommended amount. Physical inactivity contributes to heart and lung disease, diabetes and cancer, which account for 86% of our nation’s health care costs. Building walking into daily life can reduce disease and save money.

“We know that an average of 22 minutes a day of physical activity – such as brisk walking – can significantly reduce the risk of heart disease and diabetes,” added Dr. Murthy. “The key is to get started because even a small first effort can make a big difference in improving the personal health of an individual and the public health of the nation.”

At the AHA, we applaud the efforts of communities across our state for their efforts to improve the walkability and rollability of their streets and sidewalks.  We stand ready to partner with other communities to improve opportunities to be active by walking, rolling, biking and other physical activities. 

To read the Surgeon General’s Call to Action and learn how to promote walking and walkable communities, please visit www.surgeongeneral.gov

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