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1.8 Million Michiganders Have Limited Access to Healthy Food

In case you missed this story when it was first announced...

"That quick trip to the grocery store isn't so easy for more than 1.8 million Michiganders, including an estimated 300,000 children, who live in communities with limited access to healthy food. The lack of access to healthy food has a negative impact on the health of children and families in Michigan resulting in higher rates of obesity, diabetes and other diet-related health problems."

Click here to read the rest of the article on Mlive!

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Genesee County Schools Awarded MI HEARTSafe School Status

Click to read the full story on ABC12.com!

"Approximately 300 Michigan children die of a sudden cardiac event each year.  After Flushing high school student Thomas Smith died from an enlarged heart the school district became motivated to raise awareness about the risks of sudden cardiac arrest and the value of equipping schools with automated electronic defibrillators.  As a result, all 27 Flushing Community Schools have been recognized as MI HEARTSafe Schools.  The HEARTSafe School designation recognizes schools that take extra steps to be prepared for a cardiac emergency. Schools must perform an annual emergency response drill, have a CPR/AED certification for at least 10 percent of the school staff and have AEDs that are properly maintained and signs identifying where the AEDs are located."

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Lobby Day MVPs in the Spotlight

There were SO many amazing stories surrounding this year’s Hill Day that it was hard to narrow down our annual lobby day award winners. Not a bad problem to have! Please join us in congratulating these You’re the Cure MVPs, and then learn more about their stories in this video.

 

  • Science Advocate of the year – Dr. David Yu-Yiao Huang: Dr. Huang has been involved with AHA advocacy since 2003. From submitting expert written testimony and attending in-district meetings, to speaking before lawmakers, his passion for policy and his belief in the positive change policy can achieve has contributed significantly to big wins in North Carolina.
  • Volunteer Advocate of the Year – Theresa Conejo: Theresa has been one of the key proponents of Pennsylvania’s comprehensive smoke-free law. Last year, she signed a smoke-free op-ed which was picked up by major news outlets across the state. She also aggressively advocated for the proposed Clean Indoor Law. In addition, she recruits new You’re the Cure advocates at every opportunity. In fact, just recently, she signed up an additional 35 volunteers to join her in Pennsylvania’s smoke-free fight.
  • Survivor Advocate of the Year – Jim Bischoff: Jim’s own struggle with heart disease, as well as his experience with his son-in-law’s stroke, gives him a unique perspective to share during state and federal lobby days and meetings with lawmakers. His family history inspired him to provide leadership on stroke systems of care legislation. He also dedicates his time to tobacco issues, and attends in-district meetings with his lawmaker to discuss both of these important issues.
  • Youth Advocate of the Year – Cassidy Collins: Cassidy uses her story as a congenital heart survivor to illustrate the importance of AHA’s policy issues. At the age of 16, her resume is already quite impressive – she’s met with U.S. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin to advocate for tobacco control funding; she has been a top fundraiser for the Roanoke Heart Walk for two years; and she has applied to work as a youth advocate for the Alliance for a Healthier Generation.

Check out a video below highlighting the award winners!

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How to Keep the Winning Game Going

You're the Cure on the Hill isn’t the only opportunity to connect with members of Congress! As their constituents, you have the power and the RIGHT to tell them at any time to step up to the plate on the heart and stroke issues you care about most.


Here are some tips for getting your lawmaker off the bench and into the game:

 

  • Follow them on social media and send them messages on issues you care about.
  • Sign up for their e-newsletters on their websites. This is a great way to learn about events where you can meet the lawmakers in person and stay informed.
  • Work with your local AHA advocacy staff to schedule an in-district meeting. Members of Congress come home throughout the year on recess breaks, so they use this time to meet with constituents back in the district. Take advantage of their time at home and schedule a meeting to discuss the heart and stroke issues that matter to you and your family.
  • Most importantly, take action year round. Watch your inbox for calls to action from You’re the Cure and continue engaging your lawmaker through emails, phone calls and tagging them in your social media posts.

We had a real impact this week, but we need to keep the momentum going. Let's keep reminding our members of Congress that they need to step up for heart health all year round!

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May is American Stroke Month

Anyone can have a stroke and everyone should be ready.

Every 40 seconds, someone in the U.S. suffers a stroke and every 4 minutes, someone dies from a stroke. That is why The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association is inviting all Americans to become Stroke Heroes by learning and sharing the warning signs of stroke, F.A.ST. (Face drooping, Arm weakness, Speech difficulty, Time to call 9-1-1).

Recognizing and responding to a stroke emergency immediately can lead to quick stroke treatment and may even save a life. Be ready!

Here is how you can participate in American Stroke Month

  • Share the F.A.S.T. acronym with your friends, family and loved ones throughout American Stroke Month.
  • Share our F.A.S.T. Quiz to test your stroke knowledge.
  • Download our free Spot a Stroke F.A.S.T. mobile app to prepare you in case of a stroke emergency and to have easy access.

Go to StrokeAssociation.org/StrokeMonth to learn more about how you can get involved.

 

 

 

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From the Bottom of our Hearts - Thank You!

National Volunteer Week (April 12-18) is right around the corner and we couldn’t let it pass without saying how much we appreciate all your contributions as a You’re the Cure advocate. It’s advocates like you who give their time, energy, and passion to help create healthier communities across the country.  We are deeply grateful for your commitment and talent as an advocate.

Since staff can’t always shake your hand and say thank you in person we’ve got a brief video to share. When you watch I am sure you too will be moved by all the great work happening in your states and communities and we look forward to more success in the future. Take a moment to check out the video and then encourage other to get involved and join in the fun.

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Heart Walk season is here!

Heart Walk season is here!  Would you like to start a team and bring your friends and family on board?  Can you help us get your company involved?  If you’d like more information, drop an email to Jason.Harder@heart.org and I’ll connect you with the Corporate Events Director in your area!  Here’s what’s coming up:

 

 

 

 

Metro Detroit Heart Walk
May 2, 2015
Click here for more info: http://miheartwalk.kintera.org/faf/home/default.asp?ievent=1112071


Great Lakes Bay Region Heart Walk
May 2, 2015
Click here for more info: http://mid-michiganheartwalk.kintera.org/faf/home/default.asp?ievent=1112070


Washtenaw County Heart Walk & 5K Run
May 9, 2015
Click here for more info: http://heartwalk.kintera.org/faf/home/default.asp?ievent=1112073


Genesee County Heart Walk
May 16, 2015
Click here for more info: http://heartwalk.kintera.org/faf/home/default.asp?ievent=1112074

 

 

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Michigan Communities Lack Access to Healthy Foods

Approximately 1.8 million Michigan residents, including 300,000 children, do not have access to healthy fruits and vegetables.  While many people consider the urban areas to have the greatest need, which is true for Detroit, Grand Rapids and Flint, there are many rural areas in northern Michigan where people may have to drive in excess of 40 miles to reach a grocery store with healthy food options.  On March 19, 2015, the Michigan Healthy Food Access Campaign held a public kick-off and media roundtable to release a report called, "Food for Every Child: The Need for Healthy Food Financing in Michigan, published by The Food Trust and Loyola University.  The report found a direct correlation between low income residents that have little or no access to fresh fruits and vegetables and higher instances of diet related deaths.  The report and other materials can be found on the Michigan Healthy Food Access Campaign website at  Healthy Food Access MI Campaign.

It was also announced at the event the creation of the Michigan Good Food Fund to help address the issue. The American Heart Association and other coalition partners are asking the Michigan legislature for a $10 million appropriation to the fund that would go to local food banks for equipment to carry fresh produce and to offer low income loans to Michigan neighborhood stores to expand storage and display space for healthy food options.  Read More

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Help secure funding for this life-saving AED program today!

This is a critical time in Congress. Lawmakers are deciding on their funding priorities and the next round of budget negotiations are beginning. Even in this difficult economy, there are several federally-funded programs that are vital to the heart community, and we need to let our lawmakers know they must be a priority.

One such program helps buy and place automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in rural communities. The program also trains first responders and others in the community to use and operate these devices. The Rural and Community Access to Emergency Devices Program ensures those who live in rural areas or small towns have access to the tools they need for the best chance of surviving a cardiac arrest. Unfortunately, the program currently only has the resources to operate in 12 states.

Please contact your lawmaker today and ask them to prioritize funding to save lives from cardiac arrest!

People in every state should be given the best shot at surviving a cardiac arrest. Communities with aggressive AED placements have increased survival rates from about 11% to nearly 40%, which is an incredible improvement. But 38 states are still waiting for funds for this life-saving program.

Deadlines in Congress are looming, so please contact your elected officials TODAY!

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Share your Story: Alli Sidel

Alli Sidel Michigan

Hi! My name is Alli.

I was born on May 12th, 2012 in seemingly perfect health. My parents and big sister Emma were so excited to meet me. On July 20th, 2012 my family took me to our family doctor for my regular 2-month well baby visit, and while there – my doctor heard a loud “whooshing” noise while listening to my heart. From there we went to see a cardiologist (a heart doctor) who ran an EKG* (electrocardiogram) and echo* (echocardiogram) on my heart.

My cardiologist discovered that I had a large VSD* and what appeared to be a small ASD* as well as aortic stenosis.* She explained what these were, and that while the aortic stenosis may be okay without intervention, the VSD and ASD would require open heart surgery, in the near future. Before we left her office, she had consulted with the cardiac team at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and I had a surgery date of August 1st, 2012.

I was 11 weeks old when I had surgery to repair my congenital heart defects. The VSD was quite large and required a Gortex patch between my ventricles. What appeared to be a small ASD was actually many tiny holes, which required my surgeon to cut out and repair with another gortex patch. It was determined that the aortic stenosis should be fine without any intervention once the holes were patched. My surgery lasted almost 4 hours, and I stayed in the hospital for 5 days. The typical stay for this type of surgery can be anywhere from 1-2 weeks, or longer if there are complications. I was lucky that I recovered so quickly and was able to go home with only a few daily medications.

I am now 2.5 years old. My heart repair was completely successful, and I have no medications or restrictions. I have no physical indicators of my defects or surgery, other than my scars. There are so many types of congenital heart defects. Many require multiple surgeries, medications, machines, and hospital stays. Many CHD’s are discovered in utero, and require surgery within a day or so after birth. Congenital heart defects are the most common birth defects in the United States. About 1 in 100 babies are born with a CHD. Approximately 40,000 babies are born in the U.S. with a CHD each year. CHD’s are the leading cause of infant deaths in the United States. Cardiovascular disease is the second leading cause of death for children 15 and younger. Up to 1.8 million Americans alive today have a CHD. More than 50% of all children born with a CHD will require at least 1 invasive surgery in their lifetime. Nearly twice as many children die from CHD’s than from all forms of childhood cancer combined. The number of adults living with CHD’s is increasing. It is now believed that the number of adults living with CHD’s is at least equal to, if not greater than, the number of children living with CHD’s. Congenital heart defects are common and deadly, yet CHD research is grossly under-funded relative to the prevalence of the disease.

Thank you for reading my story.

Alli “Gator” Sidel

 

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